The 2021 Yamaha Tenere 700

~TABASCO~

RIDE ON ADV is what I do !
Founding Member
2011 Site Supporter
2012 Site Supporter
2013 Site Supporter
2014 Site Supporter
Vendor
Joined
Apr 4, 2011
Messages
5,781
Location
TEXAS
I wanted to pass along what I thought was a good deal. I just learned that Maxey’s in Oklahoma City will be selling all there new Super Tenere 700 for list, as the OTD price.
No mark up, no freight, no prep, no extra crap.

They said that is out the door, down the road.

I thought that was probably a good deal for the folks looking. I thought I would pass along the info if it might help someone out there. Sales man is Chris


https://www.maxeys.com/

I don’t have any association with them. A friend bought a bike and learned about it, and then I double checked.
 

Thrasherg

Active Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Messages
211
Location
Dallas, TX
I wanted to pass along what I thought was a good deal. I just learned that Maxey’s in Oklahoma City will be selling all there new Super Tenere 700 for list, as the OTD price.
No mark up, no freight, no prep, no extra crap.

They said that is out the door, down the road.

I thought that was probably a good deal for the folks looking. I thought I would pass along the info if it might help someone out there. Sales man is Chris


https://www.maxeys.com/

I don’t have any association with them. A friend bought a bike and learned about it, and then I double checked.
I guess they sold them all, nothing shows up on their WEB site.. :(
 

~TABASCO~

RIDE ON ADV is what I do !
Founding Member
2011 Site Supporter
2012 Site Supporter
2013 Site Supporter
2014 Site Supporter
Vendor
Joined
Apr 4, 2011
Messages
5,781
Location
TEXAS
The 2021 T700 should be in the US approximately May-June-July 2020. Dealers across the US are just excepting deposits.

Ive poked around for fun and many dealers are wanting more money over sticker, and of course then they add on freight, prep, Etc. Etc......

This particular dealer will sell them "out the door" for the standard / normal / regular price, once they arrive in the US. No extra BS.
 

Mak10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
1,022
Location
SE Idaho
My local dealer told me they wouldn’t be getting any in. They are primarily a UTV dealer with a couple of xt250s on the floor.

They told me they would be happy to order one with a deposit and would give a significant discount from retail.

Not my buying style of needing the latest, greatest thing on the market. I’m content to let someone else take the “new” bike hit.
 

Sierra1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
3,701
Location
DFW-TEXAS
It would be nice to ride before buying as well. Although I had never ridden the Super Tenere before I bought one.
Same here. She's the only vehicle that I've ever bought without a test drive. BUT, I am Yama-biased (no worry about reliability), I knew the weight wasn't going to be an issue, I loved the bike's purpose/mission (checked all the boxes), and she was gorgeous. No regrets. I know I'm in the minority, but the T7 doesn't do a thing for me. Nothing against the bike, just not me.
 

Don T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2011
Messages
325
Location
Denmark
I know I'm in the minority, but the T7 doesn't do a thing for me. Nothing against the bike, just not me.
I'm sure you are not a minority.
Even though the T7 have many virtues, it is a bike that (in the bigger picture) is aimed at a relatively small group of potential buyers.
Only a minority of rides would even consider buying a T7 - for all kinds of different reasons.
 

EricV

Riding, farkling, riding...
2011 Site Supporter
2012 Site Supporter
2013 Site Supporter
2014 Site Supporter
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
7,428
Location
Tupelo, MS
It would be nice to ride before buying as well. Although I had never ridden the Super Tenere before I bought one.
When I bought my '12 S10, having missed the PDP window, I hit the local dealer and they had two or order. One blue, one black. The owner was dealing with me directly and he told me he really couldn't recall which color was sold and which was available. Then he tells me, very seriously, that he has a number of people that want to see, sit on, ride this bike when it comes in. I told him flat out, I don't need to see it, sit on it and make vroom, vroom noises or test ride it and I don't care what color it is. I'm here to buy it. Needless to say, in that time frame, I didn't get a bargain, but I did buy that bike. No regrets what so ever.

Nothing personal, but when you narrow the field of bikes down to the kernel of what you want, there is no need to test ride. Easier for the S10 than the T7, IMHO. The number of shaft drive ADV bikes that were not BMW was pretty slim. :D

I'm waiting for Suzuki to buy a clue and blow the mid size ADV market out of the water with a shaft drive 650 that weighs 450 lbs. Yamaha won't do it, cause, well, some retarded moron f'ed it up.

I missed it, does the T7 have tubeless tires?
 

Sierra1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
3,701
Location
DFW-TEXAS
I'm still wondering what's taking Kawi so long to replace/update the KLR. The Versys can't be it. I see WAY more KLRs than I do Teneres.
 

EricV

Riding, farkling, riding...
2011 Site Supporter
2012 Site Supporter
2013 Site Supporter
2014 Site Supporter
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
7,428
Location
Tupelo, MS
The T7 run tubed tires, and the front rim isn't suitable for conversion to tubeless.
What makes it unsuitable for tubeless conversion? I am under the impression that nearly any wheel can be converted with the right process.
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
2,170
Location
Fullerton, CA
What makes it unsuitable for tubeless conversion? I am under the impression that nearly any wheel can be converted with the right process.
For a bike that sees a lot of pavement I can see the advantage. But for off road travel tubes are the way to go. On my Super Tenere I alway carry spare tubes. Another advantage of tubes is ability to run double rim locks. With a stiff carcass tire you can ride out a flat without worry of tire coming off the rim. At freeway speeds on the highway it's a great safety feature to get you in a safe spot to repair.

Of course the disadvantage is longer on the side of the road for repair. I really do like the fact that I can plug and go in most situations.

Nothing personal, but when you narrow the field of bikes down to the kernel of what you want, there is no need to test ride. Easier for the S10 than the T7, IMHO. The number of shaft drive ADV bikes that were not BMW was pretty slim. :D
How so very true Eric. I was lucky enough to have a good few hours of saddle time on a 1st gen S10 in 2013. I saved for a big bike for almost 5 years after that. Almost any bike can have the ergos setup to fit the rider.

There is one bike that I test rode that no amount of ergo fitting or replacement would work for me. That was the Ducati Enduro. I took one out for a spin and could not wait to get it back to the dealer. It was the most odd handling and ill fitting bike I ever swung a leg over. I even tried to flip the rear brake lever. I tried to imagine how I could get bars to fit. It was just uncomfortable. Also the heat coming off the motor roasted my legs all the way to my nuts. Quite frankly it was way too much bike anyway.

This T700 looks to be a solid machine. It is still a very heavy bike. As my riding days wind down I'm liking my Beta more and more for mellow trail riding. The S10 is great for long days in the saddle exploring remote pavement and dirt roads.

If I get another bike in the garage I'm thinking either a TM 300EN or Yamaha MT09. Just depends how my body holds out after I heal up.
 

Nikolajsen

"Keep it simple"
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
1,754
Location
Denmark
I have ridden a few Versys 650s and they were the most vibrating hand numbing junk that I can remember riding.
Åh shit:eek:
Maybe they will make the KLX 700 better, if it is true.
I believe their other KLX models shouls be good, but don't know about them at all..
But it might belong in a different thread:p, sorry:oops:
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
Joined
Nov 15, 2012
Messages
2,170
Location
Fullerton, CA
I have ridden a few Versys 650s and they were the most vibrating hand numbing junk that I can remember riding.
Steve, I had that same basic bike for close to 35,000 miles. It was a fantastic touring machine that could be converted to a sport bike with quick removal of the bags. I did nothing more than slap on a set of spare Renthal dirt bars, brass bar inserts and bar end weights. Vibration problem solved. No cruise control. With large paddle on the left and narrow paddle on the right, I could do easy 500+ mile days.

As a disclaimer, I'm used to the characteristics of parallel twin all my life. I grew up with my dads old Triumphs. Also very used to long miles on singles. My old KZ inline 4's were a luxury in smoothness. Even compared to a S10.
 

Don T

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2011
Messages
325
Location
Denmark
What makes it unsuitable for tubeless conversion? I am under the impression that nearly any wheel can be converted with the right process.
It's a 1.85" rim not a 2.15" like on other big adv bikes.
This result in a center groove too narrow to fit sealing tape. All the offers I've seen for tubeless conversion of the T7 includes a wider front rim.
 
Top