5 factors affecting daily mileage

Ronzo

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Jul 12, 2020
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Ontario, Canada
Longest day I put in was 1050km or 650mi.
Mostly highway on my way back from east coast.
I was on a 2016 Yamaha FZ1
Picture camping at Fundy and two others while travelling the Cabot trail.
Muddy day.
 

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sky4

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Jul 30, 2020
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Northern Colorado
i did 710 in a day on my bmw R100GS- fort collins to st george utah.

i htink about 690 is tops so far on the tenere. foco to yellowstone- in some SERIOUS crosswinds. about 50 miles of fairly tame dirt road in there as well.
 

EricV

Riding, farkling, riding...
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It's something you work up to for serious mileage. I think the most I've done is ~1625, but I've done several 1500+ "days". I know some seriously crazy people that have done 2400-2600 mile days. Doing a 1k day is no big deal once you learn how to do it safely and in comfort. I literally can't count the number of 1k days I've done. Not to mention the 10-14 back to back ones I've done.

That article is pretty much bs. He doesn't know how to ride long distances safely and in comfort, it's based upon his very, very limited experience. The group thing is valid, IF no one in the group has ridden LD before and hasn't ridden together. Group rides with like minded and experienced people aren't an issue. But, it only takes one person not in the groove to screw up a group.

Age plays zero factor in riding longer days. I know people in their 80's still doing 1k plus days. It's about knowing how to do it and your personal fatigue indicators, plus simply making the bike the most comfortable place to be.
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
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For me there was no working up to the milage. The only thing I did was put in a few 300-500 mile days just to make sure I would have no mechanicals. After doing an Iron Butt on a dirt bike the Super Tenere is nothing to brag about. I can jump on the Super Tenere and peel off an easy 500 mile day and not be sore.

My Ninja and Beta were my long distance bikes before the Super Tenere. The Beta is rough after about 300 miles. I found with my Shoei Quest and Airhawk pad then an Iron butt or 800 mile Death Valley ride were doable.

I have to disagree with age not being a factor for long days in the saddle. There is no human on earth who is going to have the same reflexes and alertness at 60 as they did when they were 30. I will agree a 1000 mile day on the Super Tenere is no big deal with the exception of time and where you will be doing it.

For me long distance days of 700 plus miles are just not fun anymore. You lose so much enjoyment of the ride by just focusing on making time and mileage. I cannot comment on group rides except off road.
 

Cycledude

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Rib lake wi
There are plenty of folks in a very wide range of ages that have no problem doing 1,000+ mile days, I have done plenty but at age 66 it’s not as easy as it used to be. I have never done two 1,000 mile days in a row.
 

blågrisen

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Jul 25, 2016
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Lyrestad, Sweden
Not near 1,000 miles but 600 miles (980 km) through remote parts of Siberia to reach Vladivostok and the ferry to S Korea almost two years ago.
Memorable trip as the rain absolutely pored down for 11 of the 18 hours it took.
At the time, I was 62 years young and my son 27 and both our XT660z performed flawlessly. Our butts not so much.:oops:
 

Kruzzin5

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Oct 14, 2019
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Newmarket, Ontario
Staying a little too late in Sturgis bike week, had me very pressed for time. I rode 1700 Kilometres in 19 hours and arrived home at 1:30am on a Monday morning. Started work at 7am. LOL.
 

Johnwesley

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Aug 2, 2020
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Mena, Ar
I’ve done several 1,000 mile days and one 1500. That 1500was just cause I was ready to be home. As I age the biggest thing I have to watch is what I eat when traveling and watching for sign of fatigue. Those two for me go hand and hand. If I eat very small amounts of protein based meals I can run all day and into the night. If I do a “meal” that contains starches and carbs like a good Mexican meal, the i get tired easier and have to take more brakes. Hydration for me is the other big deal. With out that I also fade much easier. I would say the last thing is proper wind protection and heat protection. If I don’t capitalize on the bodies ability to cool it self I can’t do much when the temps get up over 100.

i remember being younger and came through the panhandle of Oklahoma and it was blistering and I just felt to hot. So I took the main windshield off for about 100miles and about over heated.after a stop for food and much water I put it back on and put on my gortex gear with vents half open. I was in much better shape from that point able to travel tank to tank with out the feeling of heat exhaustion.
 

jeckyll

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May 11, 2016
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Lotusland
I don't do anything near that, with a bad back even with risers and a custom seat, there's only so many hours I'm sharp.

Having said that, I tent to stay off the interstates and ride smaller roads. Less than 10 hours riding is where I'm best.
 

Kruzzin5

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Oct 14, 2019
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Newmarket, Ontario
I’ve done several 1,000 mile days and one 1500. That 1500was just cause I was ready to be home. As I age the biggest thing I have to watch is what I eat when traveling and watching for sign of fatigue. Those two for me go hand and hand. If I eat very small amounts of protein based meals I can run all day and into the night. If I do a “meal” that contains starches and carbs like a good Mexican meal, the i get tired easier and have to take more brakes. Hydration for me is the other big deal. With out that I also fade much easier. I would say the last thing is proper wind protection and heat protection. If I don’t capitalize on the bodies ability to cool it self I can’t do much when the temps get up over 100.

i remember being younger and came through the panhandle of Oklahoma and it was blistering and I just felt to hot. So I took the main windshield off for about 100miles and about over heated.after a stop for food and much water I put it back on and put on my gortex gear with vents half open. I was in much better shape from that point able to travel tank to tank with out the feeling of heat exhaustion.
When I ride long days, I don’t have lunch at all, it literally puts me to sleep. I have a light breakfast, a big dinner, and drown it with a couple of beers. :p
 

PhilPhilippines

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Jun 20, 2020
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Philippines
Add in fuel stops and meal breaks and you’re looking at much more and then there’s speed limit areas to factor in....
18 hour day?


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I'm not against travelling at very high velocities when it is safe to do so.

I personally would never do over ten hours without significant breaks, a bike that allowed for comfortable relaxed travel and where the roads were well maintained, with open sight-lines and/or relatively free from traffic and wildlife. I'm sure much of the US has the latter, hence the high mileage.

I much prefer lighter loads on my concentration though.
 

ballisticexchris

Chris Moritz
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Add in fuel stops and meal breaks and you’re looking at much more and then there’s speed limit areas to factor in....
18 hour day?
This is how long it takes on a dirt bike factoring in a few rests, fuel stops, and full loss of rear brake just over 300 miles into the ride. Ironically I used zero oil except for transmission side spitting out 200 ML on the rear caliber, pads, tire and rotor. The manual stated to put in a liter for high speed conditions. It did not like that.

I got my plaque and have no desire to do it again. One thing I wanted to prove was to all the naysayers who state that a dirt bike is not good for long travel. I proved everyone wrong. My 498 beta is the most versatile bike I have ever swung a leg over. A Super Tenere cannot hold a candle or come close to what my Beta can do. The only advantage is the comfort.

For long days of travel and smooth fire roads Super Tenere is my go to. For everything else Beta for the win!!

DD424EFA-96C2-481A-9568-5CA42C3DF105.jpeg

F4213D9D-FBF3-45AC-ACCB-ED22B9960861.jpeg
 

PhilPhilippines

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Messages
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Philippines
This is how long it takes on a dirt bike factoring in a few rests, fuel stops, and full loss of rear brake just over 300 miles into the ride. Ironically I used zero oil except for transmission side spitting out 200 ML on the rear caliber, pads, tire and rotor. The manual stated to put in a liter for high speed conditions. It did not like that.

I got my plaque and have no desire to do it again. One thing I wanted to prove was to all the naysayers who state that a dirt bike is not good for long travel. I proved everyone wrong. My 498 beta is the most versatile bike I have ever swung a leg over. A Super Tenere cannot hold a candle or come close to what my Beta can do. The only advantage is the comfort.

For long days of travel and smooth fire roads Super Tenere is my go to. For everything else Beta for the win!!

View attachment 77607

View attachment 77606
That must've taken some concerted effort. Well done! Not for me though...
 
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