Trying to get back on two wheels

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#1
Been a few years since I've been on a bike, was on a Kawasaki Z1000 back then. Looking to get back on two wheels and the S10 really has my eye. The only question is, is a 2014+ model what I should be looking for considering the ES and CC, or should I not worry about ti?
 
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#3
my choice was to switch from a 2012 Super Tenere to a 2015 Super Tenere in part because of the ES and CC
and actually a bunch of other improvements [IMO], DisappointedElectro, with a simple hello.....
What other improvements were there? I haven't found any 2014+ S10's available in my area on Craigslist, and I didn't find any used ones at the local dealers is my problem.
 
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Boris

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#5
welcome :)

I have a 2013 Gen1 bike, get a 14+ Gen 2, even if just for the improved clutch and CCT, the former on my bike was a real annoyance until I upgraded the basket for the newer version.

IMO the gen 2 is a more refined bike, much nicer to ride.
 
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#6
welcome :)

I have a 2013 Gen1 bike, get a 14+ Gen 2, even if just for the improved clutch and CCT, the former on my bike was a real annoyance until I upgraded the basket for the newer version.

IMO the gen 2 is a more refined bike, much nicer to ride.
Thanks so much for the info! I'm looking around in my area for one, but right now it's definitely just shopping and looking. Need to save up a bit more before I can get my S10.
 
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#7
Hang out on here-you’ll see a good deal soon. CC is worth having. I was off bikes for 30 years and got mine a year ago-fantastic bike and goes so many places well. Alaska or that dirt road across town that you never took.
 
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#8
Hang out on here-you’ll see a good deal soon. CC is worth having. I was off bikes for 30 years and got mine a year ago-fantastic bike and goes so many places well. Alaska or that dirt road across town that you never took.
My only concern is that it'll be a bike that's a few states away or maybe even clear across the country. My only riding experience was that Z1000 6-ish years ago with only a bit of highway time. So that means I'll either have to fly and ride back home or pay to have it shipped, which I imagine is quite pricey!
 

Boris

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#9
Potential road trip and a great way to get to know a new bike. Look further afield and get the right bike.

The Super Tenere is a tad heavy paddling about car parks etc, but other than that it's an easy bike to get on with.
 
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#10
Potential road trip and a great way to get to know a new bike. Look further afield and get the right bike.

The Super Tenere is a tad heavy paddling about car parks etc, but other than that it's an easy bike to get on with.
I think I just have to remember that it's a heavy beast when moving slowly. If I can maybe I'll hit an empty carpark with it before making the long haul back home to get a feel for it in slow maneuvers.
 
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#13
It never feels heavy to me unless stopped or feet paddling speed. Tall and heavy then but feels fine once moving a little bit. It helps if you’re tall enough to get a firm footing.
I sat on a 2018, non-ES model at the local dealership a few months back that was strapped down, so it was just on two wheels and neither the kick or center stand. I don't know what position the seat was in though, but I couldn't flat foot it. Was on the balls of my feet. Hopefully the ground isn't too slippery wherever it is I'll be picking up this bad boy.
 

EricV

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#14
Welcome to the forum. I have had both a 2012 Gen I and now a 2015 Gen II. On the Gen I, I did upgrade the clutch hub to the Gen II version which helps calm vibrations. More noticeable on higher mileage bikes, (over 30k). The Gen II bikes have several other minor changes like rubber bushings at the handlebar risers to reduce felt vibrations. The Gen II bikes are certainly smoother, but it's not night and day difference, more subtle, but noticeable.

Depending on your budget, don't be afraid of the Gen I bikes. Very solid, just a trouble free as the Gen II bikes. I put 109k on my 2012 and the current owner is on this forum still enjoying miles. If you feel like you'll be traveling on the bike, the CC is very nice. If you're more of a day rider, it may not be a feature you use much.

Something to consider since it's been a while since you have ridden, take a course! https://motorcycletraining.com/ Team Arizona has several training locations. The basic course may seem like overkill, since you already know how to ride, but it's an excellent way to wake up those skills and re-familiarize yourself with the basics. Not to mention a great way to learn about the current methods and issues being taught. Plus, you ride their bikes for the basic course. If you no longer have your endorsement, this also gets you qualified to get that at the DMV. They offer a confident rider course as well, (CRC), if you want to wait until you have your bike and get familiar with it. The courses are worth the cost and even if you feel comfortable, it will help you be a better rider on the road.
 

EricV

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#15
I sat on a 2018, non-ES model at the local dealership a few months back that was strapped down, so it was just on two wheels and neither the kick or center stand. I don't know what position the seat was in though, but I couldn't flat foot it. Was on the balls of my feet. Hopefully the ground isn't too slippery wherever it is I'll be picking up this bad boy.
That's pretty normal. Very few will flat foot the Super Tenere. Get some good boots! Riding boots with an aggressive sole, not smooth soled touring boots. That helps a lot.
 
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#16
Welcome to the forum. I have had both a 2012 Gen I and now a 2015 Gen II. On the Gen I, I did upgrade the clutch hub to the Gen II version which helps calm vibrations. More noticeable on higher mileage bikes, (over 30k). The Gen II bikes have several other minor changes like rubber bushings at the handlebar risers to reduce felt vibrations. The Gen II bikes are certainly smoother, but it's not night and day difference, more subtle, but noticeable.

Depending on your budget, don't be afraid of the Gen I bikes. Very solid, just a trouble free as the Gen II bikes. I put 109k on my 2012 and the current owner is on this forum still enjoying miles. If you feel like you'll be traveling on the bike, the CC is very nice. If you're more of a day rider, it may not be a feature you use much.

Something to consider since it's been a while since you have ridden, take a course! https://motorcycletraining.com/ Team Arizona has several training locations. The basic course may seem like overkill, since you already know how to ride, but it's an excellent way to wake up those skills and re-familiarize yourself with the basics. Not to mention a great way to learn about the current methods and issues being taught. Plus, you ride their bikes for the basic course. If you no longer have your endorsement, this also gets you qualified to get that at the DMV. They offer a confident rider course as well, (CRC), if you want to wait until you have your bike and get familiar with it. The courses are worth the cost and even if you feel comfortable, it will help you be a better rider on the road.
Thanks for clarifying some of the differences between the gens!

Surprisingly my endorsement is still valid according to my new license I got issued this year. I did consider taking an MSF course again as a refresher, but what I was really hoping for was to find a Moto Gymkhana group here in AZ. But it seems the groups only exist on the east coast and west coast major cities.

That's pretty normal. Very few will flat foot the Super Tenere. Get some good boots! Riding boots with an aggressive sole, not smooth soled touring boots. That helps a lot.
Any suggestion on boots? I've been looking at some of the Rev'it leather boots, but it's hard to find any that are in my size!
 

EricV

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#17
The Chandler PD does a civilian motorcycle training course every now and then. Next one is probably too soon unless you can borrow a bike, next weekend on the 20th. LINK

I used to live in St George, UT, so am familiar with your area. ;)

I wear a size 12, 47 metric. The Gaerne, Forma, TCX and Sidi are some of my favorites, but your needs and budget will point you in the right direction. Look at Adventure Riding boots to narrow the field. Most have a lug type sole for better traction in loose conditions. Gaerne tends to be wider than some of the other Italian mfg boots. I've had great longevity with both Gaerne and TCX boots in the past and just got my second pair of Gaerne G-Midlands recently. Sadly those are no available in the US now.

Here is the Revzilla page on ADV boots - ADV Boots

Some basics to consider - Do you need/want waterproof? Wide foot or toe box? Sole type you prefer? Height you prefer? That helps narrow the field a little, then look at the price point that doesn't give you too much sticker shock. It's hard to fix ankles and feet, so wear as much protection as you can be comfortable in. If you're not hard core off pavement riding, you can probably not worry about hinged ankle protection, but you still want some hard puck inserts over the ankle and good heel/achilles protection. I prefer a rigid toe, but others like a soft toe boot.

If you find something you like, do a search here for that boot to see what others are saying about it. If you can't find anything or still have more questions, start a new thread asking for feedback on that specific boot. Odds are others are wearing them or have had them and can help out.

Good luck on the hunt for a bike and gear to protect you when you ride.
 
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#18
The Chandler PD does a civilian motorcycle training course every now and then. Next one is probably too soon unless you can borrow a bike, next weekend on the 20th. LINK

I used to live in St George, UT, so am familiar with your area. ;)

I wear a size 12, 47 metric. The Gaerne, Forma, TCX and Sidi are some of my favorites, but your needs and budget will point you in the right direction. Look at Adventure Riding boots to narrow the field. Most have a lug type sole for better traction in loose conditions. Gaerne tends to be wider than some of the other Italian mfg boots. I've had great longevity with both Gaerne and TCX boots in the past and just got my second pair of Gaerne G-Midlands recently. Sadly those are no available in the US now.

Here is the Revzilla page on ADV boots - ADV Boots

Some basics to consider - Do you need/want waterproof? Wide foot or toe box? Sole type you prefer? Height you prefer? That helps narrow the field a little, then look at the price point that doesn't give you too much sticker shock. It's hard to fix ankles and feet, so wear as much protection as you can be comfortable in. If you're not hard core off pavement riding, you can probably not worry about hinged ankle protection, but you still want some hard puck inserts over the ankle and good heel/achilles protection. I prefer a rigid toe, but others like a soft toe boot.

If you find something you like, do a search here for that boot to see what others are saying about it. If you can't find anything or still have more questions, start a new thread asking for feedback on that specific boot. Odds are others are wearing them or have had them and can help out.

Good luck on the hunt for a bike and gear to protect you when you ride.
I had no idea the local PD did anything like this. That's awesome! But it's definitely something I won't be able to attend due to not having a bike currently. But it's something to look at! And I was totally going to ask if you lived in the PHX area at some point since you seem to be familiar with it.

I've never really been much into shoes, I always just wore what fit me since it's kind of hard to find my size. But I do have a preference for a nice saddle brown leather that wears/patinas. My feet are kind of on the wider side and I'm a size 14, which I think is 49 in metric?

In regards to waterproof... I don't think I'll need it, but it's probably a nice thing to have, no? My only off-road experience was when I was like 10 or younger I think on a little Yamaha 150 or maybe 250 my brother had that didn't even have a clutch. I mean eventually I'd like to be able to do some off-road stuff, but mainly I just want to take some long trips and maybe do a little off pavement stuff if necessary. But I have no idea about sole type or heights, shoes and boots are a whole new world to me. I'm a South Florida boy, I pretty much wore sandals all my life.
 

EricV

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#19
These are waterproof, but otherwise fit your description. Available in black and brown. Forma Adventure Boots Gaerne Balance Oiled is another popular boot, though a bit pricy. Good boots aren't cheap!
 
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#20
These are waterproof, but otherwise fit your description. Available in black and brown. Forma Adventure Boots Gaerne Balance Oiled is another popular boot, though a bit pricy. Good boots aren't cheap!
Thanks so much! And yeah, I imagined they wouldn't be cheap. I fully expect to pay $1k+ for a pair of boots, gloves, some decent riding pants or jeans, a jacket, and helmet. Already have my eye on the Rev'it Gibson just for putting around town and the Sand 3 for long trips and the HJC RPHA 70 helmet.
 
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