Just hit 70,000 miles, and soliciting maintenance opinions

RCinNC

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Today I officially passed the 70,000 mile mark on my 2014 Super Tenere. This is the first time I’ve ever reached that high of a mileage on a bike I’ve owned. I’d like to solicit some opinions from guys that have reached or exceeded that mileage as to what sort of preventative maintenance they would recommend for an S10 at this point in its lifespan. Just to give some idea of the type of stuff I’ve already done to the bike in the past almost six years, here’s a fairly comprehensive list:

20 oil changes:
15 oil filter changes
Air filter replaced twice
Differential spline lubricated once
10 final drive oil changes:
2 Fork oil changes
New front fork seals, bushings, dust seals and o-rings
Rear wheel bearings replaced after a bearing failure
Rear shock rebuilt
Radiator flushed once
Clutch flushed twice
Brakes flushed twice
Steering head serviced twice (no parts replaced).
2 valve clearance checks (no adjustments needed)
Spark plugs changed three times
Swingarm serviced once (no parts replaced)
Battery replaced once
Throttle bodies synched multiple times

The list doesn’t include the replacement of expendable items like tires and brake pads.

I’m exclusively a road rider (which includes gravel and dirt roads). I’m not a hooligan, “bounce it off the rev limiter” sort of rider. I’ve never bushwhacked on the bike, and the hubs have never been submerged.

The bike runs great; there’s nothing happening with it that would suggest any impending mechanical issues. But, since there is a not-insignificant number of members here who’ve hit six figure mileages on this bike, I wanted to see if there are any items I should be looking to repair/replace before they become an issue on a trip.

I put this here since there isn't really a general maintenance category, but Mods, feel free to move it if you choose.
 

Don in Lodi

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How long ago were the big ones; plugs, valves, air filter. Otherwise change the oil and ride.
 

jeckyll

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I don't know what the life span of the camchain is , but that's something to think about at some point.
 

tntmo

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Interesting that you needed no valve adjustments. Mine needed adjustment on the first check and I'm about to do the second one.

Keep riding, 100,000 isn't too far away!
 

RCinNC

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I don't know what the life span of the camchain is , but that's something to think about at some point.
As far as I can find out from both the service manual and on line, there isn't a specified replacement interval for the cam chain. I've been thinking of replacing the current CCT with a new one when it's due for its next valve check (I have the next gen CCT that was put on the 2014 models, and that one has now been replaced with an even newer one), and if I do that, I'll probably replace the cam chain at the same time.
 

ballisticexchris

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I don't know what the life span of the camchain is , but that's something to think about at some point.
As far as I can find out from both the service manual and on line, there isn't a specified replacement interval for the cam chain. I've been thinking of replacing the current CCT with a new one when it's due for its next valve check
There is in fact a service interval for the cam chain. It is replaced at the wear limit of the sprockets. Everything is replaced at once including the crank. Some guys just replace the chain. I see no reason to do just a chain on worn sprockets. With proper lubrication and new CCT's at valve check time, The chain and sprockets will wear as a unit for many miles to come.

I change the CCT at every valve check/adjustment interval on my shimmed bikes.
 

RCinNC

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There is in fact a service interval for the cam chain. It is replaced at the wear limit of the sprockets. Everything is replaced at once including the crank. Some guys just replace the chain. I see no reason to do just a chain on worn sprockets. With proper lubrication and new CCT's at valve check time, The chain and sprockets will wear as a unit for many miles to come.

I change the CCT at every valve check/adjustment interval on my shimmed bikes.
That's not a service interval, it's replacement of a worn part. There's nothing in the SM (as far as I know) that specifies a mileage or age where the cam chain should be replaced, the way the manual does for something like a Hyundai with a timing belt. Absent an actual mechanical failure, I'd be interested to know how many guys have replaced the cam chain at some point based on actual wear of either the chain itself or the camshaft drive gears.
 

ballisticexchris

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That's not a service interval, it's replacement of a worn part.
Wear limit is the service interval. No mileage is specified because the parts normally last the life of the motor. I'm sure there are a few guys set in their ways and will change out the timing chain anyway. Owners choice.....
 

twinrider

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At that mileage I would be doing a fork and shock overhaul if you haven't done either yet.
 
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Check out the dismantling of Nick Sanders S10 by Alf England motorcycles on you tube, just about says all you need to know about the build quality and durability of the bike. It just keeps on running, no matter what you throw at it.
 

gv550

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Longhaulpaul is a great example for how durable these bikes are without following any maintenance schedule. I chatted with him at Bike Week a few years ago, his bike had a mechanical CCT and he just “tightened it in a bit at each oil change “ and after 200,000 miles the tensioner was bottomed out. If I remember correctly, I think he said the valve clearances had never been checked.
 

eemsreno

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As far as cam chain replacement goes, I would think that it would be hard to really know when it needed replaced without a manual adjuster. At around 110,000 miles [without checking my log book] my manual adjuster had no threads left exposed. So I replaced the chain. Now at 221,000 the adjuster still has plenty of adjustment threads showing. [witch would indicate to me that the chain took a beating rattling around in there with the stock adjuster]
As far as replacing the chain and sprockets and crank all at once , go ahead and waist your money if you want but I can't see any wear on my sprockets or crank. I'll probably put in another new chain next time I adjust the valves so I won't have to mess with it till around 400,000.
 

twinrider

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Longhaulpaul is a great example for how durable these bikes are without following any maintenance schedule. I chatted with him at Bike Week a few years ago, his bike had a mechanical CCT and he just “tightened it in a bit at each oil change “ and after 200,000 miles the tensioner was bottomed out. If I remember correctly, I think he said the valve clearances had never been checked.
My valves clearances needed adjusting at the first 26000 mile check. No wonder he had to buy two of them.... ;)
 

ballisticexchris

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As far as replacing the chain and sprockets and crank all at once , go ahead and waist your money if you want but I can't see any wear on my sprockets or crank. I'll probably put in another new chain next time I adjust the valves so I won't have to mess with it till around 400,000.
When you had it apart what was the measurement of the sprocket wear? Or did you just eyeball it? Strange that the chain would stretch so much to the point of running out of adjustment at such low miles.

The rear shock was rebuilt by Norwest Suspension at 44,000 miles. I overhauled the front forks at 67,000 miles.
I would recommend a full rebuild on the shock and at the very least oil change/bushing wear check on the forks.
 
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