Fan cut in Temp

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#1
I tested my cooling fan today but the motor ran up to 102c without the fan cutting in at all and I chickened out and switched it off!! What temp should it have come on at? Seems like I may have a problem?


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#2
Hi MattR

My UK 2014 ES, has the cooling fan cutting in at 105c, and works until it drops down to 100c, mine often cuts in when i'm travelling slow, in traffic, filtering, etc.

Not sure where the thermal fan swich is located, but it normally sits some where near the top of rad, our in in the top hose area, just join the wires together, and see if the fan works, if it does work, you then no that the thermal swtich is U S, our the fuse has blown.

A common reason for the fuse to blow is that the radiator fan motor has seized up.
 

Longdog Cymru

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#3
Hi MattR

My UK 2014 ES, has the cooling fan cutting in at 105c, and works until it drops down to 100c, mine often cuts in when i'm travelling slow, in traffic, filtering, etc.

Not sure where the thermal fan swich is located, but it normally sits some where near the top of rad, our in in the top hose area, just join the wires together, and see if the fan works, if it does work, you then no that the thermal swtich is U S, our the fuse has blown.

A common reason for the fuse to blow is that the radiator fan motor has seized up.
Yes, I agree, my fan kicks in at 105C and switches off at100C
 
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#4
Thanks all. It appears I chickened out too soon! I’ll try it again and let it run until 105 this time.

Also, my electrical connection of a fuze block has thrown up a engine warning light. I asked my dealer how to reset it and he tells me on my model it can only be reset via the diagnostic interface or possibly by letting the fan cycle a couple of times and turning it off.

I’ve connected the fuze block trigger feed into the rear light wire which may throw up a canbus issue?? Anyone else had this issue?


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yoyo

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#5
Hi Matt,

No can bus on the S10 to worry about, have you searched for the error code? I took the feed for my fuse block from the white connector for the spot lights but there should be no issue in using the rear light as a trigger wire.

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WJBertrand

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#7
You can change that with an ECU re-flash. My fan cuts in at 205F and off at 195F (96C and 90.6C respectively) since having the Flash Tune installed by a local shop.
 
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#8
Yeah 105 seems a bit high. I thought my Zx14 ran hot but it’s fans come on at 95 and goes off at 90!!

Has lowering yours caused any issues?


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#9
Matt I would recommend removing the fan and running Evans Waterless Coolant. That stuff does not boil so need for a fan. Another advantage is your system will not pressurize. I've been using it in my Beta and KTM for years. You can safely run over 300 degrees with no ill effects to the motor. Just make sure you run a synthetic oil that will handle the high temps.
 
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#10
And yes I practice what I preach! I have run both my KTM 2T and Beta 498 4T well in excess of 300 degrees with zero damage to the motors. There is no reason to believe the Super Tenere cannot do the same. As long as you are running an Ester based oil you can run an engine all day long up to 400 degrees.
83FDEFD0-B377-48E8-B200-41D55D597E8D.png
 

steve68steve

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#12
And yes I practice what I preach! I have run both my KTM 2T and Beta 498 4T well in excess of 300 degrees with zero damage to the motors. There is no reason to believe the Super Tenere cannot do the same. As long as you are running an Ester based oil you can run an engine all day long up to 400 degrees.
Metal expands when heated. Adding 100 degrees F over the fan temp to the engine will cause a 1.25" steel part to change almost .001". Aluminum is something like double that. I don't know off the top of my head what the design clearances are between things like cam and crank shafts and their journals, but I'd bet a change of a thou or two is a significant amount of the tolerance -if not exceeding it.

So, running an engine hot has potential consequences, whether your oil withstands it or not. The cooling system isn't there for show.

I'm not telling you an engine will seize at X degrees, or that you shouldn't run your own bikes however you want - just countering the notion that running engines dramatically out of the design temp range is not without potential consequence, whether you've experienced them personally or not.

How do you know that each time you go way over, you're not increasing wear which will require a re-build significantly sooner? You could be turning a 150,000 mile bike into a 75,000 mile bike, for example. You could be cooking valves and losing fuel economy and power but not enough to notice.

Before you push back, do me a favor: drain the coolant out of your bike, start it up, and let it idle on the side stand for a half and hour. Let me know what your temp read out is on the dash.
 

WJBertrand

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#14
And yes I practice what I preach! I have run both my KTM 2T and Beta 498 4T well in excess of 300 degrees with zero damage to the motors. There is no reason to believe the Super Tenere cannot do the same. As long as you are running an Ester based oil you can run an engine all day long up to 400 degrees.
View attachment 61467
I dunno temperature is temperature, just 'cause the coolant isn't boiling doesn't mean you aren't doing damage.
 

Checkswrecks

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#15
I also would not remove the fan by using the different coolant unless there was some serious test data that only the factory would have. For a start, unless you are careful with the oil, as you mentioned, there will be some real build-up issues. Running hotter in summer under heavy loads invites detonation and 100 degree hotter coolant could imply changes things like valve clearance and transmission lubricity.

There are way too many unknowns and the existing cooling system is one reason these bikes are so reliable.
 

Cycledude

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#16
what is the total miles on each of those bikes right now ?

And yes I practice what I preach! I have run both my KTM 2T and Beta 498 4T well in excess of 300 degrees with zero damage to the motors. There is no reason to believe the Super Tenere cannot do the same. As long as you are running an Ester based oil you can run an engine all day long up to 400 degrees.
View attachment 61467
 
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#17
Before you push back, do me a favor: drain the coolant out of your bike, start it up, and let it idle on the side stand for a half and hour. Let me know what your temp read out is on the dash.
You will not get a proper temp reading with the coolant drained. And not many guys are going to deliberately drain coolant and let the motor run. I'm just giving you an option. I run normal Yamaha coolant and the OEM fan on my Super Tenere.


I dunno temperature is temperature, just 'cause the coolant isn't boiling doesn't mean you aren't doing damage.
One of the reasons I went with waterless is to prevent engine damage when running really hard core slow terrain. I have found that the overheat damage always ends up 1st being the in clutch. This is the "fuse" that lets me know well before any other internal damage is done.
6DC2A3C5-ACCB-46B0-9F9B-A75F1CF3C14A.jpeg BF42448F-0F26-4758-A962-BA1EBA1DB95F.jpeg




what is the total miles on each of those bikes right now ?
I have not had to tear my motor down yet on the Beta. It's still running strong with over 300 hours and 10'000 hard miles on the motor. I have pulled the cams once for a valve adjustment at around 150hrs. I do know the waterless coolant has saved me many many times where as standard stuff would have boiled out of the motor.

My KTM 300 is long gone it was a beat to crap desert racing bike. It was still running strong with nothing more than a few top ends and well over 300 hours when I got rid of it.

Waterless coolant is not for everyone. I don't see myself getting into extreme conditions on a 700lb bike. Although I will say I had my Super Tenere fan and clutch working hard on a recent ride through a nasty 3 mile rock section at the AZ strip a few months back.
 
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#18
I tested my fan again today after the advice from here. The fan did cut in at 105c and out at 100 as described here. I was pleasantly surprised at how fast the temp dropped when the fan did cut in. Most of the time whilst riding it goes no higher than 76c so I’m pretty sure the cooling system is in good working order as you’d expect from a 2017 bike. I’m considering using OAT coolant when the time comes to change it. I use it in my other bike and it does appear to run slightly cooler.


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WJBertrand

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#20
One of the reasons I went with waterless is to prevent engine damage when running really hard core slow terrain. I have found that the overheat damage always ends up 1st being the in clutch. This is the "fuse" that lets me know well before any other internal damage is done.
Huh? The coolant is cooling the cylinders and cylinder heads, it does not directly cool the clutch, am I missing something? Also, clutch friction (when slipped) can generate temperatures well above coolant temps. I don't think there are any internal combustion engines designed to operate at 300F.
 
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