Dirt Rider Magazine wrote honestly about Yamaha Super Tenere...

WJBertrand

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A fair review but I've never seen a switch to turn of the rear ABS. I think they confused that with the Africa Twin or something.


-Jeff
 

yoyo

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I know you can retro fit a switch to deactivate the ABS but I thought it did front and rear (as well as stop the Speedo from working)
 

AVGeek

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They may have confused it with the UBS disable. Tapping the rear brake pedal first unlinks the brakes.
 

Cycledude

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I wonder how much truth there is to what they wrote in section 4 how gnarly can you get with the Tenere ? They supposedly busted a hole in the crankcase and repaired it with Quicksteel
 

magic

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This article seems to give an accurate evaluation of the bike. Note that they punched a hole in the oil sump. I have always wondered about the bikes that are sent to magazines for testing. I'm not only referring to the S10 in this test, but magazine test bikes in general. Do you guys think these test bikes are altered to cover up some of the bike's shortcomings? In this test, they seem to be pretty happy with the throttle response and bottom end torque. Their comment about the engine "allowing you to use the bottom end to chug through tighter sections" makes me think this bike may have been tuned up with a reflash. The low speed throttle response seems to be an issue with most S10s including mine. I'm sure all magazine test bikes are very carefully checked over and tested before being sent to a magazine. The latest issue of Rider magazine has a long term update on their S10 and the low end throttle response is about their only complaint. In the Rider test, they experimented with a reflash, but were looking for another solution that was more emissions compliant. ::022::
 

aage

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I have 2016es europe model and I can chug it easy, if I let go of the throttle it will just chug along at 12km/hr speed. Its a standard bike and its very smooth on the throttle , especially in T mode. On my GS I bought a device to smooth the throttle and also on my KTM , I dont feel I need it for the Tenere.
 

trikepilot

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aage said:
I have 2016es europe model and I can chug it easy, if I let go of the throttle it will just chug along at 12km/hr speed. Its a standard bike and its very smooth on the throttle , especially in T mode. On my GS I bought a device to smooth the throttle and also on my KTM , I dont feel I need it for the Tenere.
Amen. The Tenere will chug through about any terrain ::026:: ::026:: ::026::
 

gunner

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Cycledude said:
I wonder how much truth there is to what they wrote in section 4 how gnarly can you get with the Tenere ? They supposedly busted a hole in the crankcase and repaired it with Quicksteel
I've read several reviews where the oil pan was holed, not hard to do when there is no protection equipment on the bike they were given for testing. I can attest to fixing a busted oil pan with Quicksteel. We fixed Phaserburn's oil pan a couple of weeks ago while in New Mexico. His Altrider skid plate split and bent like a tin can.

As the article says, you can ride some very gnarly terrain on the Tenere, if you have the skill, just ask Eemsreno.

Steve
 

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Velvet

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Gunner said:
I've read several reviews where the oil pan was holed, not hard to do when there is no protection equipment on the bike they were given for testing. I can attest to fixing a busted oil pan with Quicksteel. We fixed Phaserburn's oil pan a couple of weeks ago while in New Mexico. His Altrider skid plate split and bent like a tin can.

As the article says, you can ride some very gnarly terrain on the Tenere, if you have the skill, just ask Eemsreno.

Steve
Holy S**T! I'm in the market for a skid plate for my new to me Tenere, but after seeing those pics Altrider is now off of my short list.

Where were you guys riding in NM?
 

gunner

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Velvet said:
Where were you guys riding in NM?
We were on the NMBDR, West of Chloride, NM. We rode up Chloride Canyon, up over the Continental Divide, and down County Road CO53 which was a pretty mild road. Phaserburn bottomed out in a dry creek bed that crosses that road. I think the culprit was too much throttle and a too soft ES setting. ::26::
 

Phil T

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Went out and took a look at my Altrider skid plate to see if it is attached to the sump and it is not. There is a bracket on the lower rear side that is secured by bolts that hold the pegs in place I think. I am trying to figure out the pic with the damage and it does not look like it was from an Altrider plate. I beat the crap out of mine going over Tin Cup pass last weekend and it did its job. Granted there is a weld that is now cracked and the lower rear bracket is bent a bit but I will be out this weekend trying to see if I can hit some more rocks.
 

RED CAT

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I punched a hole in my S10 crankcase in the same spot in Moab a few years ago with a SW Motech skid plate. The S10 has a low ground clearance and most skid plates mount to that crankcase bolt hole. Have since bought my second Tenere and have added a few rubber spacers between the skid plate and so far, so good. Hockey puck may work too. Often thought about spray foam insulation between the skid plate and crankcase. You would have to oil up the bottom of the crankcase though before spraying so that it only sticks to the skid plate. As for bottom end grunt. I'm not sure what some riders are talking about. My stock S10s have always been the Kings of Grunt by a long shot. Almost impossible to stall at crawling speeds.
 

WJBertrand

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Having done model reviews for MCN, I can tell you the manufacturers don't give you "special" bikes to review. In a couple cases they have been delivered in rather poor shape. Tires under inflated, dirty, crash damage from previous magazine, etc.


-Jeff
 

gunner

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Right, the Altrider skid plate does not attach to the oil pan. The hit that punched his oil pan had to have been pretty big, and I don't think putting anything between the pan and skid plate would have helped. Even the most robust skid plate can be overcome with a big enough hit. I definitely would not put a hockey puck in the space, that takes out the crush zone and the energy of a hit will transmit straight through it to the oil pan.

Below is a picture of the damage inside the oil pan. The oil tube was crushed and the neck of the oil pump pickup had a big crack in it.

It's a good idea to carry a spare quart of oil, SteelStick, something to clean oil off the pan with (a small bottle of 91% isopropyl alcohol or a small can of throttle body cleaner), and a tow strap in the event you can't fix it.
 

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gunner

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Phil T said:
Went out and took a look at my Altrider skid plate to see if it is attached to the sump and it is not. There is a bracket on the lower rear side that is secured by bolts that hold the pegs in place I think. I am trying to figure out the pic with the damage and it does not look like it was from an Altrider plate.
It was an Altrider skid plate. Altrider makes good stuff but anything can be overcome with enough force.
 

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Velvet

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Gunner said:
We were on the NMBDR, West of Chloride, NM. We rode up Chloride Canyon, up over the Continental Divide, and down County Road CO53 which was a pretty mild road. Phaserburn bottomed out in a dry creek bed that crosses that road. I think the culprit was too much throttle and a too soft ES setting. ::26::
Yep, I have been in that area a few times, but its been a while. Its not far from my house "as the crow flies." I need to get back up there sometime soon but I'll probably take my KTM 990 S that has 12" of ground clearance and a BDCW skidplate. ::008::
 

trikepilot

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Dunno... Just checked the AltRider website and found this in their skidplate instructions...



This is for the right front bracket and I have circled in yellow the attachment points for the left front bracket. OK... so the skid does not attach to the "oil pan" but it still attaches to the engine case - just up higher than the "oil pan" technically. So it is no wonder that any hard hit with 800lbs of bike and rider would make the skid split/deform or otherwise come into contact with the oil pan.

This is a perfectly suitable arrangement for someone who wants a more robust gravel guard. But I am not sure why anyone would want to protect a beast of this size and weight with something that attaches to the engine case. There are options out there that are FAR MORE robust for the kind of riding that created the damage you showed, Gunner.

I have abused the Tenere probably as much as anyone out there. I am on my second set of Rumbux lowers - this time I got the HD version with thicker walled steel tubing. I basically treat my Tenere like a dirtbike - all TBDBITW joking aside. I just completed 6100 miles of the TAT in 30 days. On Cinnamon Pass, I dropped the tenere with enough force to completely shear off the footpeg bracket yet no damage to the bike otherwise - thanks to the Rumbux.

It all boils down to what kind of riding you are going to do and thus what level of protection you need.
 
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