Another lowering thread...

BMatznick

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I'm another short legged guy that would like to lower his bike 1 inch. I can handle the links, no problem, but how about the forks? It appears that the outside diameter of the fork tube is smaller about a half inch below the upper clamp. Is it possible to raise the forks 1" as well?
 

EricV

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BMatznick said:
I'm another short legged guy that would like to lower his bike 1 inch. I can handle the links, no problem, but how about the forks? It appears that the outside diameter of the fork tube is smaller about a half inch below the upper clamp. Is it possible to raise the forks 1" as well?
You need to consider the math here. It's not a strait forward move things 1" on either end. The links are already figured out so you get 1" results. To keep the geometry correct, you only need to raise the forks 13mm in the triple trees. That's about as much as you can w/o ending up with un-supported fork tube anyway. Trust us on this, don't try to raise the forks 1". The handling will suck.

And hey, just between us, unless you have a 24" inseam, you really don't need to lower the bike. A custom seat and taller boots are a much better option. A little gym work out now and then will help too. If you can get a toe down, that's all you really need. You are, after all, riding the bike, not paddling it around.
 

Dirt_Dad

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EricV said:
you only need to raise the forks 13mm in the triple trees.
::026:: very important number to keep in mind. Not 14mm, not 12mm, do 13mm. It's shocking how much you can notice the difference. I've lowered both my wife's Tenres, and being precise with the front forks is very important. I ride both my stock height and her lowered bikes all the time. The lowered bike with the right geometry is just as good at the stock bike.

She also uses a lowered seat and taller boots. Can flat foot when her cases are loaded on a trip.
 

RaginTxn

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So my ignorance shows - I've found lowering links, but what about raising the front? Where do I find that part kit?

Also, I know this isn't a suspension question, but recommendations on taller handlebars vs handlebar risers? Need more back and a little up. I know, long toreoed, stubby arms and legs :rolleyes:
 
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Don in Lodi

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So my ignorance shows - I've found lowering links, but what about raising the front? Where do I find that part kit?

Also, I know this isn't a suspension question, but recommendations on taller handlebars vs handlebar risers? Need more back and a little up. I know, long toreoed, stubby arms and legs :rolleyes:
The front thing is just loosening the four clamps on the fork tubes and sliding them upwards 13mm, no parts kit.
 

richarddacat

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Bar risers is your easiest mod to move your bars. Undo the brake and clutch line clamps on the frame and that will give you enough cable/hose room for the height or add longer hoses.
 

Checkswrecks

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Watch the cornering clearance with some skid plates once you lower both ends.
 

RaginTxn

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Yes, I guess that is what RaginTxn means..but who knows:)
Yeah, I was just referring to the earlier comments about raising the suspension. I thought - raise??? So yeah, the way that Don explained it made much more sense. hahaha
 

richarddacat

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Personally if I were to lower my bike I would go with a rear shock spring for my weight with it being shorter by 1/2 to 1”.
Then slide the fork tubes up the triple clamp.

Then a side shortened side stand would also be needed.
I’d roll it up on planks for the center stand use.
 

EricV

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Either way a shorter side stand may be needed. The shortened shock is a more elegant solution, but also more $$$.

And plus one to CW comments about watching out for clearance issues when cornering, especially if there is a dip in the road. That will wake you right up. Note that there is no peg feeler on the right side, only on the left.
 

RaginTxn

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Either way a shorter side stand may be needed. The shortened shock is a more elegant solution, but also more $$$.

And plus one to CW comments about watching out for clearance issues when cornering, especially if there is a dip in the road. That will wake you right up. Note that there is no peg feeler on the right side, only on the left.
Agree - definitily need the adjusted side stand (although mine seems to lean a LOT already - I'm wondering if the previous owner chopped his...).

Maybe eventually I'll get the spring shortened, but hopefully just new links will take care of most of it, and lowering the rear load.
 

RaginTxn

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Ok, my search abilities suck. Anyone know the torque spec for the rear dog bone links?

Also, in general, is there a list of torque specs?
 

RaginTxn

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Ok - so, I thought this should be a bit easier than it has turned out to be (YouTube lied!).

I got the one bone off the right side, after some rubber mallet application - that's when I should have stopped. But I figured first time to be messed with probably in its life, so it's gonna be stubborn.

When I tried to tap out the other bone, it got stuck...I tried on the center stand, off the center stand, leaning on the side stand. Can't seem to find the sweet spot. The videos showed the guys popping them off with their hands. I applied farm logic and used a hammer.

Help!?IMG_20181013_164706.jpegIMG_20181013_164734.jpegIMG_20181013_164743.jpeg

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gv550

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Definitely place the bike up on the centre stand.
Have someone turn the bolts with a wrench or maybe impact socket, while you tap with a punch from the other side.
 

EricV

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Uhh, gentlemen, a little thought process helps a lot here. Put the bike on the center stand. Put a lever under the rear tire to use to help un-load the linkage when you pull the bolts out and they will slide right out. Gravity is pulling the rear wheel down, so you simply lever the rear up a bit with an old fence board, a pry bar, a large screwdriver, what ever you have that's a little long so you have some leverage to make it easier.

You can NOT remove linkage bolts with the bike on the rear wheel! All that weight will push against the linkage and make it extremely difficult to remove the bolts and even more fun when you pull them out, not to mention when you go to try and put them in again.
 

WJBertrand

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If for some reason you are able to remove those bolts when the bike’s weight is on the rear tire, the suspension will collapse and you’ll end up having to pick the bike up off its side where it will be laying.


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RaginTxn

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Should those sleeves inside the linkage come out with the bolt?

Uhh, gentlemen, a little thought process helps a lot here. Put the bike on the center stand. Put a lever under the rear tire to use to help un-load the linkage when you pull the bolts out and they will slide right out. Gravity is pulling the rear wheel down, so you simply lever the rear up a bit with an old fence board, a pry bar, a large screwdriver, what ever you have that's a little long so you have some leverage to make it easier.

You can NOT remove linkage bolts with the bike on the rear wheel! All that weight will push against the linkage and make it extremely difficult to remove the bolts and even more fun when you pull them out, not to mention when you go to try and put them in again.
Makes sense - I thought I had unloaded it previously, but obviously not correctly (had it on the center and used a jack to rock it back on the rear slightly) I like this approach better.

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