2015 Tenere Ohlins Suspension Experience

sedwards

New Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2010
Messages
18
Location
Austin, Texas
This will be a bit of a long post but i hope it is helpful for someone else much like several other posts on the forum were to me. Recently, I've been belatedly attempting to properly adjust my Tenere (non-ES) suspension. I really should've done this a long time ago; primarily starting with a good Sag measurement but I just never did. I took my Ohlins YA-013 shock off of my 2012 Tenere and put it on this 2015 that I bought new in 2018 and kind of assumed it was in the ballpark! I was lazy, didn't check sag, yada yada. Now I am!

So, recently bought a Slacker digital sag scale which makes solo sag checking a piece of cake. I'm 210lbs without gear.
Tenere 3.jpg

The initial results were a bit eye-opening. According to Ohlins/Yamaha, we should have roughly 57-62mm of Race Sag for our 190mm of total rear wheel travel. I'll assume we all know the proper way to check sag, with gear, tools etc. that you would be riding with. Well, just my body weight, no gear, tools, panniers etc., I had 72mm of sag with max preload on the Ohlins shock. Then I put my panniers on the bike and measured with 25lb dumbbells in each one to simulate a loaded bike and had well over 90mm of sag. I guess that's how I've been riding on long trips. Gee, wonder why my bike didn't turn that well! Next step was to observe what spring rate I had on my bike. I did quite a bit of research on this site and others and always noticed that folks with the Ohlins shock never had all the exposed threads on their shock like mine did. Mine appeared to have a ton of preload on the spring.

Tenere 3.jpg


Tenere 2.jpg



I did a quick measurement and the spring length, while installed on the shock was 192mm. Well, I thought this was supposed to be a 220mm spring length but it turns out that mine was only a 200mm spring (hence all the distance the preload adjuster had to be screwed down to initially compress the spring. It also turns out that my hydraulic preload adjuster wasn't doing much to add preload. When I pulled the shock out, it was apparent that it had leaked considerable oil and probably was in dire need of a rebuild. So, here's the good part. I had been planning a big trip out to New Mexico and Colorado and didn't have much time to get this fixed. I used the Google and found a place called Pro Pilot Suspension in NJ that is an Ohlins service center. Those guys were awesome (Thanks Jim!) I two-day aired my shock on a Monday, they received Wed. morning, swapped the spring, rebuilt the shock and had it back to me by Friday! Awesome service from those guys! Ohlins in North Carolina were great too, shipping out a 170kg/nm spring in a 220mm length vs. the 150kg spring in a 00mm length.

New Spring:

Tenere 48.jpg
Old Spring:

Tenere 52.jpg

According to ProPilot, the hydraulic adjuster should give you a measurable 7-9mm of spring compression from open to fully compressed. I measured mine and it was spot on that after the service and the spring rate change. I reinstalled the shock, checked the Race Sag with just my weight (still no gear though, but no added preload) and it was right at 57mm! Just about perfect. I then cranked in full preload and could reduce the sag to almost 50mm so should have plenty adjustability once I add a load.

Tenere 51.jpg

Moral of the story: Check your damn sag! I can't wait to go ride as I'm sure the bike will be held up in a better portion of the stroke, it will turn a bunch better, have a much better ability to handle additional weight and feel much sportier. Great service from Pro Pilot in NJ and also from the Ohlins service center in NC.
 
B

ballisticexchris

Guest
I have the ES and checked my sag straightaway after getting the bike. Odd thing is even with large sag numbers my bike has no odd handling characteristics. Only modification I have made was to get a rising link to offset the excess sag to balance the bike.

Ohlins is some top flight suspension so I agree that you should get the right rate for the investment. Good on you Sir.
 

jrusell

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2017
Messages
404
Location
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
This will be a bit of a long post but i hope it is helpful for someone else much like several other posts on the forum were to me. Recently, I've been belatedly attempting to properly adjust my Tenere (non-ES) suspension. I really should've done this a long time ago; primarily starting with a good Sag measurement but I just never did. I took my Ohlins YA-013 shock off of my 2012 Tenere and put it on this 2015 that I bought new in 2018 and kind of assumed it was in the ballpark! I was lazy, didn't check sag, yada yada. Now I am!

So, recently bought a Slacker digital sag scale which makes solo sag checking a piece of cake. I'm 210lbs without gear.
View attachment 72336

The initial results were a bit eye-opening. According to Ohlins/Yamaha, we should have roughly 57-62mm of Race Sag for our 190mm of total rear wheel travel. I'll assume we all know the proper way to check sag, with gear, tools etc. that you would be riding with. Well, just my body weight, no gear, tools, panniers etc., I had 72mm of sag with max preload on the Ohlins shock. Then I put my panniers on the bike and measured with 25lb dumbbells in each one to simulate a loaded bike and had well over 90mm of sag. I guess that's how I've been riding on long trips. Gee, wonder why my bike didn't turn that well! Next step was to observe what spring rate I had on my bike. I did quite a bit of research on this site and others and always noticed that folks with the Ohlins shock never had all the exposed threads on their shock like mine did. Mine appeared to have a ton of preload on the spring.

View attachment 72336


View attachment 72338



I did a quick measurement and the spring length, while installed on the shock was 192mm. Well, I thought this was supposed to be a 220mm spring length but it turns out that mine was only a 200mm spring (hence all the distance the preload adjuster had to be screwed down to initially compress the spring. It also turns out that my hydraulic preload adjuster wasn't doing much to add preload. When I pulled the shock out, it was apparent that it had leaked considerable oil and probably was in dire need of a rebuild. So, here's the good part. I had been planning a big trip out to New Mexico and Colorado and didn't have much time to get this fixed. I used the Google and found a place called Pro Pilot Suspension in NJ that is an Ohlins service center. Those guys were awesome (Thanks Jim!) I two-day aired my shock on a Monday, they received Wed. morning, swapped the spring, rebuilt the shock and had it back to me by Friday! Awesome service from those guys! Ohlins in North Carolina were great too, shipping out a 170kg/nm spring in a 220mm length vs. the 150kg spring in a 00mm length.

New Spring:

View attachment 72339
Old Spring:

View attachment 72340

According to ProPilot, the hydraulic adjuster should give you a measurable 7-9mm of spring compression from open to fully compressed. I measured mine and it was spot on that after the service and the spring rate change. I reinstalled the shock, checked the Race Sag with just my weight (still no gear though, but no added preload) and it was right at 57mm! Just about perfect. I then cranked in full preload and could reduce the sag to almost 50mm so should have plenty adjustability once I add a load.

View attachment 72342

Moral of the story: Check your damn sag! I can't wait to go ride as I'm sure the bike will be held up in a better portion of the stroke, it will turn a bunch better, have a much better ability to handle additional weight and feel much sportier. Great service from Pro Pilot in NJ and also from the Ohlins service center in NC.
Glad you got it sorted.
215lbs myself and I am running a 170N spring as well.
 

Doodlefadd

Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2020
Messages
35
Location
Singapore
This will be a bit of a long post but i hope it is helpful for someone else much like several other posts on the forum were to me. Recently, I've been belatedly attempting to properly adjust my Tenere (non-ES) suspension. I really should've done this a long time ago; primarily starting with a good Sag measurement but I just never did. I took my Ohlins YA-013 shock off of my 2012 Tenere and put it on this 2015 that I bought new in 2018 and kind of assumed it was in the ballpark! I was lazy, didn't check sag, yada yada. Now I am!

So, recently bought a Slacker digital sag scale which makes solo sag checking a piece of cake. I'm 210lbs without gear.
View attachment 72336

The initial results were a bit eye-opening. According to Ohlins/Yamaha, we should have roughly 57-62mm of Race Sag for our 190mm of total rear wheel travel. I'll assume we all know the proper way to check sag, with gear, tools etc. that you would be riding with. Well, just my body weight, no gear, tools, panniers etc., I had 72mm of sag with max preload on the Ohlins shock. Then I put my panniers on the bike and measured with 25lb dumbbells in each one to simulate a loaded bike and had well over 90mm of sag. I guess that's how I've been riding on long trips. Gee, wonder why my bike didn't turn that well! Next step was to observe what spring rate I had on my bike. I did quite a bit of research on this site and others and always noticed that folks with the Ohlins shock never had all the exposed threads on their shock like mine did. Mine appeared to have a ton of preload on the spring.

View attachment 72336


View attachment 72338



I did a quick measurement and the spring length, while installed on the shock was 192mm. Well, I thought this was supposed to be a 220mm spring length but it turns out that mine was only a 200mm spring (hence all the distance the preload adjuster had to be screwed down to initially compress the spring. It also turns out that my hydraulic preload adjuster wasn't doing much to add preload. When I pulled the shock out, it was apparent that it had leaked considerable oil and probably was in dire need of a rebuild. So, here's the good part. I had been planning a big trip out to New Mexico and Colorado and didn't have much time to get this fixed. I used the Google and found a place called Pro Pilot Suspension in NJ that is an Ohlins service center. Those guys were awesome (Thanks Jim!) I two-day aired my shock on a Monday, they received Wed. morning, swapped the spring, rebuilt the shock and had it back to me by Friday! Awesome service from those guys! Ohlins in North Carolina were great too, shipping out a 170kg/nm spring in a 220mm length vs. the 150kg spring in a 00mm length.

New Spring:

View attachment 72339
Old Spring:

View attachment 72340

According to ProPilot, the hydraulic adjuster should give you a measurable 7-9mm of spring compression from open to fully compressed. I measured mine and it was spot on that after the service and the spring rate change. I reinstalled the shock, checked the Race Sag with just my weight (still no gear though, but no added preload) and it was right at 57mm! Just about perfect. I then cranked in full preload and could reduce the sag to almost 50mm so should have plenty adjustability once I add a load.

View attachment 72342

Moral of the story: Check your damn sag! I can't wait to go ride as I'm sure the bike will be held up in a better portion of the stroke, it will turn a bunch better, have a much better ability to handle additional weight and feel much sportier. Great service from Pro Pilot in NJ and also from the Ohlins service center in NC.
I've gotten the same ohlin shocks and surprisingly with my small Asian ass, the 130 springs got my sag right.

Do u have a comp rebound settings u end up love returning to?
Currently on ohlins recommended 11clicks comps 16 clicks rebound. It feels fine, just wondering if anyone else has any magical combo I dan try.
(my bum.sucks at differentiating small increments in setting adjustments )
 

Ss1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Messages
184
Location
Russia
Excellent! But in Moscow, the Ohlins companies told me that there are no such shock absorbers for Tener with electronic suspension ((
If it's not a secret, how much does such a shock absorber cost? And how does it work in relation to the old?
 

StefanOnHisS10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2020
Messages
618
Location
The Netherlands, Friesland.
Excellent! But in Moscow, the Ohlins companies told me that there are no such shock absorbers for Tener with electronic suspension ((
If it's not a secret, how much does such a shock absorber cost? And how does it work in relation to the old?
That’s what I was told too. I was told to use the electronics and if I wanted more I need to swap the whole thing. But then e.s. on the back isn’t working anymore... :(
 

RENOVATOR20

funrider
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
42
Location
Gainesville, Tx
I have Ohlins front and rear on my 3rd owner 2014 ST with 19,000 miles. I contacted Jaxon (Tabasco), for help adjusting and teaching me about the suspension. He helped me set up the front and rear shocks. Unfortunately, he found a rear shock leak. I sent the rear to Ohlin for a rebuild and put the stock shock on as a short term replacement. I also pulled the front forks and changed the fork oil with 5wt Ohlin fork oil. I received the rebuilt Ohlin rear shock and installed it this week. The tech who rebuild the shock called me to let me know what he had to replace for the rebuild, and how best to set up the shock for my weight and riding style. He said it would be a improvement after the rebuild and adjustment. He was right. The rear shock has improved the handling and ride. I am still playing with the front shock settings but like how it is set up for paved road and gravel.

Front preload set at 12 turns in
compression set at 13 clicks out
rebound set at 11 clicks out

Rear preload on spring at 8mm with adjuster set at 1 turn in. (I have the 150 spring)
Compression at 10
Rebound at 15

Thanks Jaxon for helping me understand this Ohlin suspension.
Thanks Ohlin USA for giving me a call during the rebuild. The tech set it up to my needs after our conversation.
 
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