What TenereGUY has been up too

TenereGUY

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Technically the "Axles" do not require any grease or lube. There is nothing that actually pivots on them.
It is usually ok to wipe a very thin coating on them, only to prevent any corrosion but is not required.
I understand that as it is the bearings that rotate. Many manuals instruct to put on that thin layer of grease. I do as it does facilitate it going in and out. I was working on a buddies Kawasaki voyager he had just bought. Low miles... 30 year old bike. Came to removing the rear axle and if an axle is stubborn I have an oak dowl rod that I use to persuade it with and it hadnever failed me. Well, that splintered on me and no movement. He was watching me and I grabbed a metal rod and made sure it was a smaller diameter than the axle and beat on it four or five times. Grimacing each time. Finally it popped loose. It was dry and corrosion had basically almost welded it in place. Cleaned it up, lubed it and ever since it slides in and out beautifully. So now I guess I am biased towards lubricant!

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TenereGUY

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Jan 19, 2023
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Illinois
Got in the garage late but was able to clean and lube the clutch lever and rear brake pedalpivotbolt. Couldn't find a spot where the torque for the brake pedal was displayed. Looked in the torque list section and found a general chart. 8 mm bolt at 11 ft/pounds. Did that and then thoroughly checked the list and found it listed at 19#. Hmmm, ok but it sure seemed like it was twisting a lot to get there. I did but I was nervous.
Both pivots were dry. They aren't now! Adjusted the brake/clutch levers too.
20230302_202404.jpg
Dry as a bone. You could see the wear starting on the bushing and lever.20230302_203025.jpg

Cleaned this little bushing and lubed it. It had some dried up grease on it. These use to be $10 but if you care for them they last a long time. This one was starting to show wear already.20230302_203146.jpg
I like this lubricant to penetrate and coat.. not a WD type but a lubricating oil that won't dry out and leave a sticky coating like WD.20230302_212038.jpgpedal pivot... no lube left on the load bearing surfaces. Just a little bit in the grooves.20230302_212205.jpg20230302_214122.jpg
It was a 7.8 mm bolt but I found the lower picture stating 19. Is 19 correct?20230302_214435.jpg
Used my cotter pin puller to remove and install the locking pin on the brake pedal bolt ... how else would you get it?

I think that the ABS Mod with a switch is not how I will go about that. I think I will get a fused normally closed relay and then use a keyed power source for a switch to open the relay to turn off the ABS. Any other ideas? My only other worry about that is... how to weatherproof the fuse slot??? I have to do some more research on this.
 

scott123007

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Joined
Jul 27, 2012
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1,451
Location
Jupiter, Florida
I think that the ABS Mod with a switch is not how I will go about that. I think I will get a fused normally closed relay and then use a keyed power source for a switch to open the relay to turn off the ABS. Any other ideas? My only other worry about that is... how to weatherproof the fuse slot??? I have to do some more research on this.
Why are you obsessed with disabling the ABS? I think you need to do some off road with it first to realize how good the front ABS is. Regardless what you read on here, you don't "skid steer" this bike around corners because you're not throwing around this bike like you would a dirt bike. The front ABS is so good, you really don't want to disable that, because that will stop you in any condition or terrain, and you can't disable just the rear.

Now, if you can figure out how to disable traction control "on the fly" you'd be our hero. LOL
 

thughes317

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May 27, 2018
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Location
The Bluegrass, KY
Why are you obsessed with disabling the ABS? I think you need to do some off road with it first to realize how good the front ABS is. Regardless what you read on here, you don't "skid steer" this bike around corners because you're not throwing around this bike like you would a dirt bike. The front ABS is so good, you really don't want to disable that, because that will stop you in any condition or terrain, and you can't disable just the rear.

Now, if you can figure out how to disable traction control "on the fly" you'd be our hero. LOL
Until you enjoy the thrill of having absolutely no brakes at all when descending a steep hill covered with loose shale because the factory ABS won't let you use them. Ask me how I know. I did the mod, it's been quite useful at times...of course I also know how to manually modulate my front brake in an off road situation. YMMV
 

scott123007

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Jul 27, 2012
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Jupiter, Florida
Until you enjoy the thrill of having absolutely no brakes at all when descending a steep hill covered with loose shale because the factory ABS won't let you use them. Ask me how I know. I did the mod, it's been quite useful at times...of course I also know how to manually modulate my front brake in an off road situation. YMMV
It is a little disconcerting grabbing a handful of front brake and feeling nothing for a second, but they will work, whenever there is ANY traction. I can assure you, there is nothing you can do manually to find traction better than your front ABS, other than being flat on your ass from trying to do it manually and therefore using the whole side of your bike for traction. ;)
 

thughes317

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May 27, 2018
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1,037
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The Bluegrass, KY
It is a little disconcerting grabbing a handful of front brake and feeling nothing for a second, but they will work, whenever there is ANY traction. I can assure you, there is nothing you can do manually to find traction better than your front ABS, other than being flat on your ass from trying to do it manually and therefore using the whole side of your bike for traction. ;)
Not gonna debate this, suffice to say "if you know, you know". Others that have experienced the situation I described can chime in......
 

TenereGUY

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Joined
Jan 19, 2023
Messages
936
Location
Illinois
Why are you obsessed with disabling the ABS? I think you need to do some off road with it first to realize how good the front ABS is. Regardless what you read on here, you don't "skid steer" this bike around corners because you're not throwing around this bike like you would a dirt bike. The front ABS is so good, you really don't want to disable that, because that will stop you in any condition or terrain, and you can't disable just the rear.

Now, if you can figure out how to disable traction control "on the fly" you'd be our hero. LOL
I have been reading accounts on the the WWW that this ABS is very good. I have also decided to try it out as you have suggested. I do know that I sure don't want it to just pulse and not stop. I don't plan on slinging this around as it sure isn't a 275# dirt bike. I like options and control. Not just what the manufacturer thinks is best. I watched the latest GMC truck commercial and how the driver pushes a button and takes both hands off the wheel and basically plays patty cake! Why promote such irresponsible behavior? I like to drive and want to be in control... not the machine. That's just me. So, for now research and while I do that I will also do real world testing...


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TenereGUY

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Joined
Jan 19, 2023
Messages
936
Location
Illinois
It is a little disconcerting grabbing a handful of front brake and feeling nothing for a second, but they will work, whenever there is ANY traction. I can assure you, there is nothing you can do manually to find traction better than your front ABS, other than being flat on your ass from trying to do it manually and therefore using the whole side of your bike for traction. ;)
I do understand the science behind it and your point is well taken. Once the wheel starts sliding you have less friction and no steering.

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thughes317

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May 27, 2018
Messages
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Location
The Bluegrass, KY
I have been reading accounts on the the WWW that this ABS is very good. I have also decided to try it out as you have suggested. I do know that I sure don't want it to just pulse and not stop. I don't plan on slinging this around as it sure isn't a 275# dirt bike. I like options and control. Not just what the manufacturer thinks is best. I watched the latest GMC truck commercial and how the driver pushes a button and takes both hands off the wheel and basically plays patty cake! Why promote such irresponsible behavior? I like to drive and want to be in control... not the machine. That's just me. So, for now research and while I do that I will also do real world testing...


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Yeah, when you're in a situation where you don't dare touch the front brake (steep down hill on loose rock or greasy wet clay) and your only hope is to lock up the back wheel and hope the skid slows you down, only the ABS refuses to let you lock the back wheel so you're just free-wheeling......engine braking can only help so much.
 

scott123007

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Jul 27, 2012
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1,451
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Yeah, when you're in a situation where you don't dare touch the front brake (steep down hill on loose rock or greasy wet clay) and your only hope is to lock up the back wheel and hope the skid slows you down, only the ABS refuses to let you lock the back wheel so you're just free-wheeling......engine braking can only help so much.
I'll just go down swinging, by saying there is never a time that you shouldn't dare to touch the front brake. It won't lock up regardless of conditions. If you have enough traction for your rear wheel to do anything, your front brake will do it better. Go to the rockiest, gravely, marbley road you can find, get up to about 50mph, and grab a HANDFUL of front brake and feel what happens. It's a little hard to wrap your head around, especially if you're old like me, and habits are hard to break, but I didn't get the racing resume I have by not always experimenting. And like YOU said, "those who know, know." :)
 

TenereGUY

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Jan 19, 2023
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Location
Illinois
Yeah, when you're in a situation where you don't dare touch the front brake (steep down hill on loose rock or greasy wet clay) and your only hope is to lock up the back wheel and hope the skid slows you down, only the ABS refuses to let you lock the back wheel so you're just free-wheeling......engine braking can only help so much.
EXACTLY!
 

Sparko

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2012
Messages
33
Location
Denver, Colorado
I was racing dirt bikes back in the 70's here in Colorado, no ABS back then. I like to be able to turn the ABS off when I want to. I take the S-10 on some of the tougher passes here in Colorado and with the ABS off going down some of the steep sections I know it is much safer for me.
How to add the switch: https://yamahasupertenere.com/index.php?threads/how-to-quick-and-easy-abs-disable-switch.22577/
I totally agree, need to lube the Clutch and front Brake levers. I am on my fourth S-10 and all of them did not have any lube.
 

Tenman

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Dec 7, 2013
Messages
2,097
Location
Natchez Ms USA
Not gonna debate this, suffice to say "if you know, you know". Others that have experienced the situation I described can chime in......
I’ve had more than one scare going down hill before I put n a abs switch. Sometimes u need it to lock Now and dig in. That’s the only time I ever need it.
 

TenereGUY

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Jan 19, 2023
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936
Location
Illinois
Got home and nobody was home so in the garage I went and got done what I thought was going to take a while and it was about 2 hrs! And I have tomorrow off! And the speed bleeders might be here tomorrow too!
I got the T-Rex Racing belly pan on and the lower AltRider crash bars on. My biggest worry was trying to align the front engine mount bracket/AltRider lower bars/T-Rex Racing Bash Plate where they all mount on the front engine lower bracket mounting holes... and it was a pain. My worry is that you have a three objects under some stress and the hole is at an odd angle with a steel bolt going into aluminum engine. What could go wrong??? I got them aligned after failing until I got two jacks out to adjust them. Trying to look up and get my trifocals aligned to was a bit of a challenge... but finally I thought I had one and put the bolt in and think I got a couple of threads on but wasn't sure. Turned the ratchet up by the head of it with a couple of fingers so no real force and it went in! Next one was a bit easier and I was able to thread that one in quite a ways with the fingers. The T-Rex video isn't the best but watching it and rewinding and watching section by section with the drawings and written instructions I was able to get it. Took a while to find the torque specs for the bolts so I took pictures of them so you don't have to hunt so much. Somewhere I saw a place selling a water pump shield and I think I want that. I cracked a water pump casing once and don't want anything like that to happen again!
Only thing left now is throttle body synch, upper AltRider bars and clutch fluid and brake fluid after the bleeders are changed out... and the controversial ABS Mod.
Is anyone going to be around Marlinton WV April 1st, 2nd, 3rd? Know any back routes around there? We'll be at the Marlinton Motor Inn.
20230303_200904.jpg
When you go to pull your tank up you are going to feel resistance. It is because of these two hoses connected to the bottom of the tank. Vent and overflow. I pulled and the tank came up and the hoses promptly came off. They are in a holder down low. Before you pull the tank up you need to remove them from this holder and kinda help feed them up as you pull up the tank. 20230303_200923.jpg
You can see them coming down.20230303_200929.jpg
Continuing down past the frame20230303_200959.jpg
See the holder? They slide back in there after you have pulled them back down as you lower the tank. There is a fatter part of the hoses with a extra girth that slides in the holder. Then they slide through that white plastic square and hang out the bottom.20230303_201027.jpgI have my index finger on the bracket/holder.20230303_204221.jpg
A motorcycle jack. Usually I use a 2x4 but I had this foam on the lift in case I have to kneel down on the concrete or diamond plate... works good for that and as a soft surface to guard against marring the new belly pan. Used that to align pan up or down.20230303_204226.jpg
Those crash bars needed to move up and over and I was by myself and having no luck... hey, I could use my floor jack and a 4x4! Between that and the motorcycle jack I got them aligned after all!20230303_205628.jpg
Looks good20230303_205636.jpg
It's no Jaxon/Tabasco pan but I didn't know about his yet. If I had I would have gotten his. This should get the job done though!
 

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TenereGUY

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Illinois
So here are pictures of the bolts and the torque specs. 20230303_211620.jpg
46# this is the left rear bolt just behind the kickstand. Use blue loctite per the manual. Underneath the shift lever... and yes, I will wipe off that excess grease!20230303_211946.jpg
12# Front lower left pan bolt. goes through pan into bracket. Bracket goes up to connect where stock sliders used to be. 20230303_211958.jpg
12# Left lower back bolt. Goes through pan into bracket that goes up and connects to the bolt behind the kickstand.
20230303_212004.jpg
You can see both 12# left bolts

20230303_212106.jpg
12# Right front that goes through pan into bracket. Bracket runs up to connect where stock sliders on the right side connect. Front/forward hole.
20230303_213445.jpg
This was the exhaust pipe hanger bolt. Rear lower right back bolt just behind exhaust pipe shield. I couldn't find a torque specs in the book. It was an 8 mm bolt so 11 pounds. But I did 20 but was paying close attention to how it felt as I was tightening it. Anyone actually know what it is supposed to be?
20230303_213625.jpg
Where the bars connect to the bike where the stock sliders were bolted. I did 20# but couldn't find anything directing me to a certain poundage. Anyone know this one? Do on both sides

20230303_205859.jpg
54# on the front engine mount bolts. There are 4 of them. 17 mm hex or a larger Allen (10 mm?) I did these first, then went back to the two rear mounting bolts. Then did lower sides then upper sides at crash bars.
 

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TenereGUY

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936
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Illinois
Got out my Uncles old Carb Synchronizer that's got to be at least 30 to 40 yrs old. He passed away last summer and I was the nephew that cleared out his house and 5 sheds so I also got his tools. It was so encrusted with grime that I gambled and took it apart and cleaned it and put it back together.
Went to Rockford IL and at NAPA Auto Parts got some new vacuum line for the Carb synch that I cleaned up and a relay kit that was weather proofed. Came home and whipped up lunch then out to the garage. I got out the light switch I bought from some place like RevZilla. Mounted it on the right handlebar. Threaded the wires along existing wires. Figured out where I wanted my relay to be. Above where the tool pouch is stored. Had a friend who is an Electrical engineer draw me out how I should wire it while at work yesterday and used it today.
In short: fuse is out and I have a stab on the hot side of the fuse holder (rear stab) that stab is wired to a 30 amp fuse holder which then has a line going to the relay. Out of the relay a heavy wire with a stab comes back to the original fuse holder on the downstream side (Front). To trigger relay: I tapped off of the wire going to the DC port up by the dash. Tapped off right behind the fuse box as it is more protected there. That tapped off power goes to the hotside of the switch on the handle bar. Then the wire on the switched side of the switch comes back to the trigger wire on the relay. Then a trigger wire comes out of the relay to a ground to finish the trigger circuit. I mounted the relay with double sided sticky tape from 3M.
Turned the key on and put my ear down by the relay and flipped the switch. Heard a nice click. Then tested it with a simple test lamp connected to ground. It all works! 20230304_113944.jpg
Torn down Carb Synchronizer. All clean and ready to put back together...Hopefully. 20230304_115122.jpg
Got it back together! Hopefully good for about 30 years.

20230304_165547.jpg
Tapped of the 3 amp circuit for trigger power. Non essential and if I lose it not a big deal and low amps.20230304_165741.jpg
Fuse box tucked back in place. Relay ended up just in back of this and to the right.20230304_170215.jpg
Bought this connector kit several years ago thinking it would be nice to have around. Today it was! 20230304_171756.jpg
I crimp them on then solder them to ensure good connection now and in the future. Then I dab some dielectric grease around it and slide the rubber cover over it so keeps the moisture out.20230304_171844.jpg
And it is packed towards the back with that dielectric grease. 20230304_171941.jpg
End result. This is how I connected up my switch so if I need to replace it in the future I can do so easily. 20230304_172941.jpg
Relay kit from Napa. It was perfect for what I needed. 20230304_174728.jpg
Diagram that helped me out. If anyone needs a neater dwg then let me know and I will put one up!
 
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