What Material is Used in the Tenere's OEM Front and Rear Brake Pads?

What Material is Used in the Tenere's OEM Front and Rear Brake Pads?

  • Semi-metallic

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • Organic

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • Sintered copper

    Votes: 1 20.0%
  • Ceramic

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Don't know

    Votes: 2 40.0%

  • Total voters
    5

Super10East

Member
Joined
May 30, 2017
Messages
30
Location
East Coast
I'm trying to compare the OEM pads to other aftermarket choices, but can't find much information on the material used. Was wondering if anyone might know exactly. I'm getting replacements soon and want to know how much I need to budget. I realize the trade-off between performance versus how much friction the pads are generating against the brake disc, and would prefer to spend a bit less than what I'm seeing listed for OEMs. It's also possible that the front pads are different in composition from the back. Partzilla has photos of the packaging, listed below. They appear to use different backplates, not sure if that affects the material.

Front Pads
Rear Pads

I've read others here using performance pads (HH style) on the front with no accelerated rotor thinning, also mentioning a softer rear brake disc that might only do well with organic pads. I'm probably overthinking this, but it is technically interesting.
 

Attachments

B

ballisticexchris

Guest
I have to be honest. I just don't know. And I'm not going to google it and try to be smart. If I were to guess I'm thinking they are sintered.
 

Super10East

Member
Joined
May 30, 2017
Messages
30
Location
East Coast
I have to be honest. I just don't know. And I'm not going to google it and try to be smart. If I were to guess I'm thinking they are sintered.
I searched far and wide, the only close documentation I could find was some reference to the brake structure on Yamaha's Japanese website, located here with google translate. At best it says it's "friction material." I guess I'm going to have to call Yamaha America Corporate :confused:.
 

Super10East

Member
Joined
May 30, 2017
Messages
30
Location
East Coast
The back of the standard pads are marked as HH, suggesting they’re also sintered pads.
After doing some more research, I wasn't able to find anything on the rear pads. Are you saying the rear standards have HH labeled on the back? Not seeing that in the photos above or any where else. HH looks to only apply to the front pads.
 
B

ballisticexchris

Guest
Brake pad threads are just like oil threads, tire threads, and suspension threads. Some people will run the cheapest product possible. And some, like myself are looking to use the most reliable, safest, best performing product. And yet there are others who are looking for nothing more than squeezing every last mile out of a product regardless of safety, reliability, durability.
 

Longdog Cymru

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2018
Messages
1,678
Location
Swansea, Wales, UK
Often, front and rear pad materials are different, with a harder HH sintered material on the front where the bias is for use and heat build up and a relatively softer GG material used for the rear pads. I’m generalising here as I have no way of knowing what pad material Yamaha use, but for my money, I’d go for EBC HH for the front and either EBC GG or EBC HH for the rear when replacement time comes around.
 

WJBertrand

Ventura Highway
Joined
Jun 20, 2015
Messages
4,562
Location
Ventura, CA
Often, front and rear pad materials are different, with a harder HH sintered material on the front where the bias is for use and heat build up and a relatively softer GG material used for the rear pads. I’m generalising here as I have no way of knowing what pad material Yamaha use, but for my money, I’d go for EBC HH for the front and either EBC GG or EBC HH for the rear when replacement time comes around.
I think this is correct, the OEM rear pads should also be marked for their friction rating, I can’t remember if they’re GG (I think so) but I know they are lower rated than the HH front pads. Lots of info here:


http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~smacadof/DOTPadCodes.htm


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

Boris

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2013
Messages
2,155
Location
midlands. UK
After doing some more research, I wasn't able to find anything on the rear pads. Are you saying the rear standards have HH labeled on the back? Not seeing that in the photos above or any where else. HH looks to only apply to the front pads.
I changed all round to EBC HH pads mid 2018, noting at the time that the standard fronts I took out were also HH pads. I took little notice of the rears, other than to just change them to EBC. However, I changed the rears back to standard well before due, as the rear disc was wearing quite quickly. There is no noticeable wear on the front discs.

In short, I don’t know if the rears are HH in standard set up, my guess is not, which is likely why disc wear on the rear is slow with standard pads. I have no evidence of this, just an opinion.

I should add, that I much prefer the front EBC HH set up to the standard front pad set up. I will definitely stick with EBC fronts at pad change time.
 
Last edited:

Nikolajsen

"Keep it simple"
Joined
Jul 1, 2017
Messages
2,045
Location
Denmark
Brake pad threads are just like oil threads, tire threads, and suspension threads. Some people will run the cheapest product possible. And some, like myself are looking to use the most reliable, safest, best performing product. And yet there are others who are looking for nothing more than squeezing every last mile out of a product regardless of safety, reliability, durability.
And some that just buy the one Yanaha have chosen to fit the bike.
I normaly buy OEM airfilter, olifilter and brakepads/brake disc because I think these parts are importent.
 
B

ballisticexchris

Guest
I plan on sticking with OEM until next year. Then I will do the required brake hose change with Galfer brake lines, Super Wave rotors, and HH ceramic pads. It simply blows my mind how many guys disregard maintaining the brake system.

I wonder how many riders actually test out the braking performance by checking the stopping distance before and after servicing their brakes. I did some panic stops just before changing my fluid and right after. Stopping distance is always shorter after the service.
 

MattR

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2019
Messages
1,181
Location
North Hampshire UK
I put PFM discs on my Zx14r along with SBS pads and it transformed the brakes. I used to run OEM discs with EBC HH pads but the front discs warped and I had to replace them. The main difference is that with the EBC pads you grab a big handful of brakes and then as the discs heat up you have to release pressure but with the SBS pads you can keep a uniform pressure up all through the braking giving much better control.
Although the s10 brakes are better than I thought they would be (especially the rear) I’ll try SBS pads in there next time as a comparison.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

jrusell

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2017
Messages
460
Location
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
Had the calipers off the other day for cleaning and measuring the pads to see if new pads might be needed before riding begins.
Thought I would post up the rear pad info incase anyone was interested.
AK V2524 FF 3223 is the code, so manufactured by Akebono, FF friction rating
 

AntrimMan

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
86
Location
North Central Rhode Island
I purchased this 2013 big white beast in August of 2016 with 1190 miles. It's not my only MC.
This past weekend July-30-2023, 22K miles, I had this buzz.
I knew I needed tires and expected those to be the buzz kill. Replaced tires. No joy.
The front rotors and pads are hardly wearing.
I do use both brakes F&R manually. Rear then front intentionally to break the unified link. It's just how I ride.
Previously at 12K miles I removed the rear rotor lips and replaced the very thin original rear pads with new Yamaha Super Tenere pads. FF.
IMO the rotor was serviceable.
Fast forward to this week, the buzz.
The rear rotor now has some mountains and valleys on the inside surface that I did not initially notice even when replacing the tire. I need to pay better attention.
I used to grind my own. I have now lost my access to the Blanchard grinder, it went to believe it or not China, with the rest of the company equipment.
On Monday morning July-31-2023 at 6:00 am I ordered a rear rotor, rear pads and rotor screws just in case from Rocky Mountain ATV.
On Wednesday morning August-02-2023 at 11:30am my order arrived.
Old parts removed, new parts installed and no buzz. This is the first time in my life I paid to get rid of the buzz, normally it has been quite the inverse, ha-ha.
A tip of the hat to RMATV. I am a satisfied retail customer again.
The pads are indeed Akebono FF, pic attached.
IMG_2942_1.JPG
I must say this MC is murder on rear brakes and headlight bulbs.
I think there are too many holes in the rear rotor, it is too soft for the pads compound and I think the headlights need some filtered ventilation.
Besides that and other that the agricultural racket I am deeply satisfied.
Properly applied it will surpass most and keep up with the rest.
Rattle on boys!
All the best.
 

Sierra1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
15,440
Location
Joshua TX
. . . . I do use both brakes F&R manually. Rear then front intentionally to break the unified link. It's just how I ride. . . . I must say this MC is murder on rear brakes and headlight bulbs. . . .
Everybody has their own style, but I learned early on that she doesn't hardly need back brake at all. I too used to use both to slow down. With her front-end weight bias, the back end is light. Now, the only time I activate the back (only) brake is for slow technical riding. I absolutely love being able to deactivate the linked system. But between her fantastic engine braking, and not needing "extra" back brake, I just use the lever. My back brakes didn't need changing 'till over the 20k mile mark. The fronts looked about halfway. The worst bike I had for pads, front and back, was the Honda ST1300. Every 5k miles. Of course, that bike got rode like a rented mule. The Beemer RT needed new rears every 10K miles. The fronts got replaced at about 40K mi.

The headlight thing, in my opinion, is due to the heat reflected back from the metal shield when it on "low" beam. I ride in mostly in the daytime, and I leave it on "high" beam. No reflected heat, and 6 yrs and almost 25k miles on the original bulbs.
 

SkunkWorks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Messages
1,860
Location
Colorado
The headlight thing, in my opinion, is due to the heat reflected back from the metal shield when it on "low" beam. I ride in mostly in the daytime, and I leave it on "high" beam. No reflected heat, and 6 yrs and almost 25k miles on the original bulbs.
You know one of them is going to fail on you now.................. :p
 
Top