Waterproof gloves

Ronzo

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Jul 12, 2020
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Ontario, Canada
I have had gloves in the past that claim to be waterproof but are nothing more than a plastic sheet between the glove and liner.
Although they are waterproof, ever try to get a wet hand in a glove with fleece liner over a plastic inner glove? I lost my #*%@ at the side of the road trying to get them back on with damp hands. Ended up cutting liners out in frustration.
At least with my snowmobile gloves I can put liner on separate from glove and then put glove over it. No such luck with my current gloves.
I was looking at making the leap to Gore Tex and also found out about Gore grip. Gore grip is when they bond all the layers (outer, membrane and liner) together.

I would be very interested to hear your thoughts as well as glove recommendations. Here is a short article explaining Gore grip:

Advancements in glove technology construction have moved at a snail’s pace for what seems like forever. As a supplier of waterproof seat covers, I’ve had my share of wet-weather riding as I test my product in all types of conditions. I’ve learned a few things over the years about gloves and what a rider needs from this sometimes overlooked piece of equipment. Gore-Tex introduced the world to the waterproof/breathable membrane. Along with others in the industry, the membrane has reached a near perfect state of the art. While the breathable part of the equation can be a bit iffy at times, the general level of competence is so well developed that functionally the membrane works as intended.

So, if the membrane is so good, why this review? The problem with most motorcycle rain gloves is in the construction technology and lining materials. Most waterproof gloves are constructed with an outer shell of leather, textile, or some combination, a waterproof membrane, and a glove liner; in essence, the glove is a waterproof “baggie” captured between the shell and the liner. This method of construction results in a perceptible feeling of disconnect between the rider’s hand and the motorcycle grip due to slippage — the “baggie” free-floats between the shell and liner. This was the only way to construct the glove, until now.

Gore Grip is a newly developed construction method that effectively bonds the waterproof/breathable membrane to the shell of the glove. With the membrane no longer free-floating, any feeling of disconnect has been eliminated. The effect is a glove that feels no different from your regular riding glove.

The other big issue with old glove construction technology is the liner used. A ride in wet weather of any significant length usually results in at least one remove/replace glove cycle and can introduce moisture into a glove. Gloves are often the last thing put back on at any sort of stop (after wet helmets, wet jackets and what have you) and results in a damp hand or a completely wet hand inserted into the glove. A lightly fleeced liner becomes like Crazy Glue when wet, and the glove liner seems to have supernatural resistance to having the human hand inserted. And when a wet hand is withdrawn it can bring the glove liner out with it! At best, the liner simply twists as you struggle to insert your slightly damp hand into your glove.

Those days are also gone with the new Gore Grip assembly method. Because the membrane is bonded to the shell, it doesn’t move, dislodge, or resist a slightly damp hand.

Gore Grip technology is showing up in more and more offerings, and you’ll find it described in some first-generation products as Gore-Tex X-Trafit. Either way, your older glove technology has been replaced with something much better. Like most things Gore, the price reflects the quality and innovation Gore is known for. It’s worth it. My HELD rain gloves with either of these names work fantastically and have eliminated any and all problems of both wet hands and liner integrity or the lack of it.
 

Ladlesport

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Jun 24, 2018
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CA
Nice little read, thanks.
I wear a standard armored riding glove (whatever is comfortable) with the KLIM Forecast glove over top when its raining.
https://www.klim.com/Forecast-Split-Finger-Glove-4099-000

On really cool days I also wear them, adding headed grips they create little ovens for your hands. 100 (ish) bux well spent and 100% waterproof.
2 years later, countless days in the rain, still great.

p.s.
I should have got one size bigger than what measured.
 

Checkswrecks

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Thanks to a talk with one of our Canadian I went to firefighter extrication gloves a few years ago. Waterproof, kevlar, and impact protected, usually for less money. Plain black or bright colors for commuting visibility.
 

Ronzo

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Jul 12, 2020
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Ontario, Canada
Thanks to a talk with one of our Canadian I went to firefighter extrication gloves a few years ago. Waterproof, kevlar, and impact protected, usually for less money. Plain black or bright colors for commuting visibility.
Interesting! How do you find them? Are they stiff and require significant break in or anything? How do you find your hand/finger dexterity with these gloves?
I am located in Canuckistan and found a distributor pretty quick.

 

Checkswrecks

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Interesting! How do you find them? Are they stiff and require significant break in or anything? How do you find your hand/finger dexterity with these gloves?
I am located in Canuckistan and found a distributor pretty quick.

I bought them online from Ringers. The geeky colors of the Ringers R-345 will never fit in with the Harley/Beemer crowd but these became my summer glove when I commuted. NOT waterproof, they are comfy and not damaged when going down on the dirt bike, plus they do have a velcro wrist closure. No question when commuting that car drivers will see them when you point or gesture.

Definitely do not require break-in and you forget them pretty quick. I see in the article below that somebody questioned the stitching and have to say that after several years, mine have no threads loose or anything like that and all of it is double stitched. btw - Amazon pricing costs way more because the R345 on Amazon is $73 while they are $28 direct from Ringers on the link below. The 347 is the same glove with the colors reversed and the slightly different all yellow R161 SuperHero version is only $20:

For rain and cooler weather I have a pair of yellow/black R-327 bought also for commuting and they are OK. Very protective with the kevlar lining, water proof, and good feel when riding. Not warm enough for winter and too warm for a summer day because no matter what Ringers says, these don't breath. Other downsides are that I prefer a gauntlet glove for rain and they have no velcro to keep them on during a slide.

For more info:
 

magic

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Jul 6, 2015
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MENASHA, WISCONSIN

I've been using these for several years now. Put them on over your regular gloves. They work pretty good, some rain runs down my sleeve into my gloves in really heavy rain. The 3 finger design won't let you flip off other drivers though...design flaw.
 

14kmtnman

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May 18, 2014
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I am really pleased with the Aerostich triple digits for 7 or 8 years for rain and cold winter use. In winter use, they easily add another 10-20 degree warmth barrier. In summer, they are really easy to put over my daily riding gloves, wet or dry. It appears from the above link, that Klim did what Aerostich should have done by putting a gripper material on the palm and fingers. I have not seen nor used the Klim version, but that gripper addition would make a big difference in overall usability and convenience. If and when the Aerostich gloves wear out, I will have to look at the Klims too. The Aerostich gloves are slippery dry or wet, just being a Gore material.

I am not into bright colors, but I do like those orange and yellow gloves from Ringers.
 

Cycledude

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Rib lake wi
My preferred rain glove is Held Steve gloves, nope they ain’t waterproof or even water resistant but it’s usually not that cold when raining, if my hands do get cold all I have to do is turn on the heated grips. The windshield wiper on the Held Steve gloves works excellent.
Also own a pair of orange Aerostich Triple Digets, the windshield wiper is terrible ! I mostly use them for cold weather riding, they work great for that but I would prefer they got rid of the three digits and simply made them like a mitten it would be cheaper and easier.
 

RCinNC

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That was a great suggestion from Checkswrecks, and one I'd never even heard of before. I did some looking around on line, and found that not all the gloves made by Ringers look like a part of Iron Man's costume.

Ringers Gloves.JPG
 

Checkswrecks

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Let me know if anybody finds them with the velcro wrist closure AND waterproof.
 

Ronzo

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Ontario, Canada
Thanks for everyone’s thoughts and recommendations on this. It helped a lot!
I bit the bullet and just ordered a pair of Klim Vanguard GTX long as well as a pair of their liners.
Will report back with a review once I put them to the test.
 

Cantab

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Christchurch NZ
A bit late to the party but i use these

 

spam16v

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Aug 11, 2014
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B-low, NY
Aerostich Elskin ropers in warm weather, competition ropers in cold weather and Aerostich covers in wet weather. All membranes fail, gloves are tough to keep sealed. I use treatment on the gloves when I wash them so they’re resistant to an extent. Chasing $200 waterproof gloves is fruitless.
 
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