Suspension adjustment

Dogdaze

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Juan said:
EJY712 - that's a fantastic writeup. Now I got it. You had to spoonfeed me. Thanks for this.
Juan
::026::
I'll give it a try this weekend, and see if I can fine tune it, if not I'll put it back to where it was and live with that set-up, was not bad, just think I may as well try.........
 

4jranch

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

ejy712 said:
Juan, I can understand your confusion. Let me see if I can convert the strategy above into a procedure. It might be more understandable that way. We'll see.

How to tune Super Tenere Suspension:

[list type=decimal]
[*]Adjust preload front and rear to set sag per other excellent articles on this forum. This will assure the best use of suspension travel. If you can't set the proper sag you will have to compromise or get different springs.



[*]Record current settings (so you can return to your current setup if this procedure doesn't work for you):
Tighten to the stops (hardest setting) all damping adjustment screws, record the number of clicks as you tighten each adjustment:
1 rebound damping adjustment dial on the bottom of the rear shock assembly
2 rebound damping adjustment screws, one on the top of each fork
2 compression damping adjustment screws, one near the bottom of each fork
Note: when you make these adjustments think of tightening a screw INTO the shock.
  • As you tighten the screw you are hardening the damping.
  • As you loosen the screw you are softening the damping.


[*]Back out all damping adjustments to the softest setting:
Unscrew the damping adjustments to the following values:
1 rear rebound damping dial - unscrew 20 clicks to softest setting
2 front rebound damping adjuster screw - unscrew 10 clicks to softest setting
2 front compression damping adjuster screw - unscrew 13 clicks to softest setting


[*]Take a ride. Take a screw diver along.
Go slow at first because your motorcycle will bounce, porpoise, and wallow.
Make adjustments as needed per steps 5 and 6 below.
Note:
  • The number of clicks on the fork rebound damping adjustment screws should always be the same on the left and right.
  • The number of clicks on the fork compression damping adjustment screws should always be the same on the left and right.


[*]Adjust rebound damping harder on front or rear as needed to stop bouncing, porpoising, and wallowing. Increase rebound hardness only one click at a time, and only on the front or the rear, then test. As the ride smooths out from adjustments increase your speed and find bumpier roads to test. The trick is to figure out which wheel (front or rear) is bouncing and needs adjusting.


[*]If you bottom out the front forks:
  • Adjust front fork compression damping one click harder.
  • Adjust front fork rebound damping two clicks softer.
  • Then go back to step 5.


[*]When you have achieved the ride you want record all damping and preload settings.

[/list]

You will have to increase the rear preload and adjust the rear rebound damping harder as you add weight to the rear (pillion, luggage, or both). A good starting place is to adjust damping for the rider alone, set sag for the new load by adjusting preload on the rear, then go to step 5 above. I did not have to adjust the front preload and damping once they were set. But I don't add weight to the front (no tank bag or crash bar bags). Record all damping and preload settings for each situation you make adjustments for (for example: rider, rider and luggage, rider and pillion, rider and pillion and luggage).

Remember, you aren't adjusting just any old suspension. You are adjusting the suspension on your bike for you to ride. Your final adjustments are likely to be different than mine.

Once you get a good suspension setup I found that the ride is fantastic - the bike feels like it's almost floating over most roads/terrain.

Have fun experimenting with this...
Very nice explanation, thanks for taking the time to post this info. I am trying to set up a new 2014 S10 for my wife, 5'5' and 125#. I have installed a lowering link and dropped the triple tree 13mm to get the bike down low enough for her to be comfortable. A lowered seat will be next. Working on the suspension now and while setting the sag is well documented the other settings are a little more difficult to understand and explain. With your clear explanation I sure we can get this done with minimal problems. When we find her best settings will post up just for a reference point for someone else that might face a similar situation. Thanks again.... ::012::
 

4jranch

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Ok, as promised here are the initial settings. Definitely a work in progress.

Rider, my wife, 125# without gear, 5'5".
Bike '14 S10 with Bumount pannier rack (bags off), altrider Givi top box mount ( no top box), RideOnAdv lowering link and the triple tree dropped 13mm

Settings:

Front- preload- fully soft ( loaded sag 54mm, measured along the fork)
Rebound- 4 clicks from fully soft,
Compression- 4 clicks from fully soft

Rear- preload-5 (loaded sag >64mm, measured from the rear axle straight up)
Rebound- 5 clicks from fully soft

Yes I know that our sag numbers are not the same. With the bike set up as above the static rear sag is 44mm. To get to a 57mm sag on the rear we were adding more preload than my wife wanted,(raising the bike).

As I stated in the first line this is a work in progress but I wanted to post up these numbers as a baseline for us and anyone else that might be interested before I forgot them.
 

taskmaster86

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Bushyar15 said:
Sure. BTW I took it out yesterday for a proper off-road ride and the changes were definitely a vast improvement over the stock settings.

Rather than try to scan pictures or take pictures, I'll reference the Owner's Manual that came with my bike and should have come with everyone's bike.

DISCLAIMER: The following is what I did. I take no responsibility if you strip, over tighten or screw up your suspension in any shape, manner, or form doing what I did...

For Front/Fork Preload Setting: Page 4-25, First picture. Spring Preload Adjusting Bolt - Turn in direction "A" (clockwise) till there are 3 lines showing above the Front fork cap bolt. Reference the second photo in the manual to see how they count lines). Use a box wrench or socket to turn these bolts or you could slip and bugger up the bolts. They'll work, just looked "hacked"

Fork Rebound - Page 4-26 Fork Rebound is on top of the forks Using a flatblade, carefully turned in direction "A" (clockwise) till they stopped. DO NOT use excessive force!!!! I then counted 6 clicks in direction "B", counter-clockwise

Fork Compression - Page 4-26, second diagram on the page - using a flatblade screw driver turn in direction "A" (clockwise) till they stopped. DO NOT use excessive force!!!! I then counted 6 clicks in direction "B", counter-clockwise

I ENSURED BOTH FORK LEGS HAD THE EXACT SAME AMOUNT OF CLICKS and lines showing.

Rear Shock Preload Page 4-27 - First diagram. Put the motorcycle on the Center-stand, turn the knob in direction "A" (Clockwise) till the indicator is even with "HARD".

Rear shock Rebound Damping, Page 4-27 Second Diagram Turn in Direction "A" till it stops. (Clockwise if you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the shock). Then turn 6 clicks in direction "B" (Counter-clockwise if you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the shock)


Thats what I did :)
I just found this thread doing a search. Sorry to raise it from the dead but it is very helpful. It is by far the best suspension thread I have found yet!

I made these adjustment today and wow what a difference! I would like to confirm for everyone that the suspension settings suggested above will work well for the 2014 and later models.

Maybe we should make this thread, or a similar one, a sticky?

Thanks
 

silvergoose

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Thanks to the OP. This has been a very interesting topic. I will getting my new Tenere sometime next week and will put the information to work a.s.a.p.

I do have a question: what is the standard shock spring rated for a 2013 Tenere? Front fork spring rate?

Thanks again, as stated this is area most people,myself included, never really understand.
 

frez

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

OK, so I'm an idiot. Had the bike for two years and 43,000 miles and not adjusted the harsh forks other than putting on full preload for my 270 pounds as assumed it was down to the spring. Finally got around to playing with it yesterday and found both compression and rebound were screwed all the way in, i.e. full hard.
 

Dogdaze

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

frez said:
OK, so I'm an idiot. Had the bike for two years and 43,000 miles and not adjusted the harsh forks other than putting on full preload for my 270 pounds as assumed it was down to the spring. Finally got around to playing with it yesterday and found both compression and rebound were screwed all the way in, i.e. full hard.

And?.......................................................

Oh c'mon now, don't hold us in suspense, how was it and how many turns out did you go for it to 'fit' you?
 

frez

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Well I adjusted rebound at work before going home from full hard to all the way soft and then 3 clicks back towards hard. That definitely improved things, it felt much smoother over bumps. When I got home I checked the compression and found that was full hard too. So I thought, what the hell, and I put went soft and then +1 click towards hard on both.

The results were great this morning, in fact the rear Wilbers shock feels a bit harsh now where before it felt great. So have gone two clicks softer on compression on the rear for the trip home and will see how that works out (rebound a bit trickier to get to at work). I shall start adjusting one thing at a time each day until I find my sweet spot. I do have some linear springs and Andreani valves to go in the forks at some point, maybe the 48k service in August.
 

Checkswrecks

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

This is a great thread and thanks for resurrecting it!


The suspension is surprisingly better than folks give it credit for and also surprisingly easy to adjust. If people write down the stock settings they can always return it to how it is now and see for themselves.


Refer to the owners manual and count clicks from the end of the adjustment range to have the baseline and know where to bring it back to in case you think you goof up.
 

ADKsuper10

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Bushyar15 said:
Sure. BTW I took it out yesterday for a proper off-road ride and the changes were definitely a vast improvement over the stock settings.

Rather than try to scan pictures or take pictures, I'll reference the Owner's Manual that came with my bike and should have come with everyone's bike.

DISCLAIMER: The following is what I did. I take no responsibility if you strip, over tighten or screw up your suspension in any shape, manner, or form doing what I did...

For Front/Fork Preload Setting: Page 4-25, First picture. Spring Preload Adjusting Bolt - Turn in direction "A" (clockwise) till there are 3 lines showing above the Front fork cap bolt. Reference the second photo in the manual to see how they count lines). Use a box wrench or socket to turn these bolts or you could slip and bugger up the bolts. They'll work, just looked "hacked"

Fork Rebound - Page 4-26 Fork Rebound is on top of the forks Using a flatblade, carefully turned in direction "A" (clockwise) till they stopped. DO NOT use excessive force!!!! I then counted 6 clicks in direction "B", counter-clockwise

Fork Compression - Page 4-26, second diagram on the page - using a flatblade screw driver turn in direction "A" (clockwise) till they stopped. DO NOT use excessive force!!!! I then counted 6 clicks in direction "B", counter-clockwise

I ENSURED BOTH FORK LEGS HAD THE EXACT SAME AMOUNT OF CLICKS and lines showing.

Rear Shock Preload Page 4-27 - First diagram. Put the motorcycle on the Center-stand, turn the knob in direction "A" (Clockwise) till the indicator is even with "HARD".

Rear shock Rebound Damping, Page 4-27 Second Diagram Turn in Direction "A" till it stops. (Clockwise if you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the shock). Then turn 6 clicks in direction "B" (Counter-clockwise if you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the shock)


Thats what I did :)

Thank you for this.

I have ridden 2400 miles so far on mine on the stock settings not really knowing what to do with all of this. I followed your lead and set mine up like this today. Very simple to do. I am roughly the same weight as you (225#) so hopefully this will work for me as well. I am not a serious off-roader, but do travel some crappy dirt roads with tons of ruts, potholes, and gravel.
 

ADKsuper10

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Went for a ride for a couple of hrs. Seems pretty good and takes bumps well. Tried some really, really aweful paved back roads today and it sucked up bumps nicely.
 

ADKsuper10

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Rear Shock preload advice

Hi guys - quick question. My suspension was stock setup before today when I changed things a bit. Last night riding home at night I got flashed a lot by oncoming traffic when I had my low beams on. I figured I may have had the preload set a bit soft (2 lines under the "soft" mark), so I cranked it all the way down to "hard" and backed the damper 6 clicks from the end.

I weigh about 225#. From the centerstand fully suspended I have a measurement of 29". Sitting on the bike it squats to 26".

Does this sound about right to you guys or do I have the preload set too hard?

I am not usually loaded its just yours truly and my topcase with maybe my gym bag in it. So, fully geared up total weight for me & gear is probably 240#.
 

ADKsuper10

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Re: Rear Shock preload advice

well....just answered my own question I think. On the Touratech webiste they have the maximum travel listed as 190mm (7.48"). The race sag should be 57mm (2.24"). I have a lovely 3"......ahem.....

Kinda disappointing it can't be setup better with stock components. Any of you guys load them up panniers and all and ride away anyway and not worry about this stuff?
 

tomatocity

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

ADKsuper10 said:
Went for a ride for a couple of hrs. Seems pretty good and takes bumps well. Tried some really, really aweful paved back roads today and it sucked up bumps nicely.
What are your setting? Tire pressures?
 

ADKsuper10

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

Bushyar15 said:
Sure. BTW I took it out yesterday for a proper off-road ride and the changes were definitely a vast improvement over the stock settings.

Rather than try to scan pictures or take pictures, I'll reference the Owner's Manual that came with my bike and should have come with everyone's bike.

DISCLAIMER: The following is what I did. I take no responsibility if you strip, over tighten or screw up your suspension in any shape, manner, or form doing what I did...

For Front/Fork Preload Setting: Page 4-25, First picture. Spring Preload Adjusting Bolt - Turn in direction "A" (clockwise) till there are 3 lines showing above the Front fork cap bolt. Reference the second photo in the manual to see how they count lines). Use a box wrench or socket to turn these bolts or you could slip and bugger up the bolts. They'll work, just looked "hacked"

Fork Rebound - Page 4-26 Fork Rebound is on top of the forks Using a flatblade, carefully turned in direction "A" (clockwise) till they stopped. DO NOT use excessive force!!!! I then counted 6 clicks in direction "B", counter-clockwise

Fork Compression - Page 4-26, second diagram on the page - using a flatblade screw driver turn in direction "A" (clockwise) till they stopped. DO NOT use excessive force!!!! I then counted 6 clicks in direction "B", counter-clockwise

I ENSURED BOTH FORK LEGS HAD THE EXACT SAME AMOUNT OF CLICKS and lines showing.

Rear Shock Preload Page 4-27 - First diagram. Put the motorcycle on the Center-stand, turn the knob in direction "A" (Clockwise) till the indicator is even with "HARD".

Rear shock Rebound Damping, Page 4-27 Second Diagram Turn in Direction "A" till it stops. (Clockwise if you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the shock). Then turn 6 clicks in direction "B" (Counter-clockwise if you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the shock)


Thats what I did :)
Sorry - set mine up just like Bushyar15 on the first page of this thread.
 

ADKsuper10

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Re: Do Yourself a Favor and Adjust Your Suspension.

I'm about 225lbs and run just a top case.

Tire pressures are 33 & 43psi
 

Checkswrecks

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Re: Rear Shock preload advice

At and over 200 lbs you'll run out of sag. Either you can crank the pre-load up and have a stiff ride or change the spring (and typically the shock since it should match what the spring can do).
 

ADKsuper10

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Thanks guys thats what I was afraid of. Not keen right now on spending additional $ on upgrading shocks. I will, though if that's what it takes to correct the issue.

I wonder how long I can get away with the OEM shock cranked all the way under my normal street riding and very occasiional back roading (mostly still paved - just horrible pavement)? I plan to ditch the topp case and just run panniers (maybe OEMs) not very loaded at all - mostly just for convenience when going to and from work to store gear.

I am roughly 225# of solid steel plus normal riding gear.

Any thoughts?
 
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