Super Tenere Break In

Tremor38

All roads fair game...all game outta the way!
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#41
Firefight911 said:
I dunno, they are circular so I have a hard time figuring out where the start and end. ::013::
Tell me about it! I must have made one hundred passes with the torch last time I tried to anneal one cause I could figure out where the beginning OR the end was! 8)
 

Mittenduck

I have a Super 10 but only have about 3,600 miles
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#42
Yikes, what a hornets nest! The whole point of any motorcycle is to make its rider happy. Just be happy with the way you do it. Of course racers are happy with fast reliable engines.

But just to stir up another hornets nest: about breaking in aircraft engines - mechanics don't break in aircraft engines; pilots do. The only exception I'm aware of was on navy carriers when a jug (cylinder) or two was replaced, the mechanics would put a couple of teaspoons of tooth powder into the new jugs and run them for a couple of minutes, then remove, clean, and reinstall them. They could do the whole process in under an hour to get the planes back in combat fast.
 
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#43
::008::
Mittenduck said:
The main point of the break in is to seat the rings to cylinder wall. Little bits of metal will get scraped off until the seal is close to perfect. To a lesser extent this will also happen in the bottom end and the transmission. It is essential to do this right away. Race teams break in their engines on a dyno at high power settings, but they never let them get too hot. If the combustion pressure is too low during the break in, the rings will never seat correctly. The result will be blow by during the life of the engine. You will know this has happened if the oil gets dirty quickly after an oil change. That engine will never deliver best power and will suffer a shortened service life. In addition, dirty oil full of combustion by-products will be lubricating the transmission and clutch. Does that sound like a good thing?

The first 30 miles are critical. Let the engine warm up, then take it up to 70%-80% power (5,500-6,500) in 1st gear and hold it there for 5-10 seconds. Then bring it back down to just above idle for 20-30 seconds. Monitor the engine temperature. Now repeat the process in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th gears. Use 5th and 6th gears for your cool off periods. Obviously you need a good place to do this. An uncrowded freeway can work pretty well. After 30 miles of this, change the oil and filter. This will get rid of all the little bits of metal. After this you can run it to full power occasionally until it has about 100 miles on the odometer. Change the oil and filter again. The rings will now be properly seated and you can ride it any way you like from now on.

Why does Yamaha not recomment this? Why do none of the manufacturers recommend this? Ask their legal departments. "Yes, Judge, I was busy monitoring my gears, time, and temperature while wildly variying my speed, just like Yamaha told me to do, and the next thing I knew I was in the hospital." No wonder they tell you to go slow. I used to break in bikes strictly by the book... never again. I always ended up with slow, oil burners.

Incidently, the high power break-in method is required by all manufacturers of piston aircraft engines. I know there are differences. I don't even want to think about the BMW guys and their unique ideas.
 
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#44
This made for an interesting read, especially as i picked up my new bike Friday and have done the first 250 miles 'by the book'.

What have i learned:

1. There are strong views on both sides of the argument (i have no idea what is right).

2. You are not always very nice to each other on this forum :-(

In the end as a someone without the knowledge to make an informed assessment i'm following the book. Seems the safest option. If i miss out on 0.27bhp so be it. If i cared about the last 0.27bhp i wouldn't have bought the S10 to start with.

Very happy to respect everyones views and choices.

For what its worth, bike is running nice, and freeing up. Spent a few hours riding twisties in the hills in 4th and 5th, taking it up to 4k revs. 60mph was plenty on the roads i was on and lots of changes of revs.


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#45
The nonsense of bringing it up to say 80mph then back down again applied when oil pumps, well sucked and really does not do much in todays engines.

Racers do not break in an engine, they hit it, go and go hard. I just drive whatever I want, how I want without beating the living hell out of it initially, whether or not that is realistic that is how I have handled I dono how many new engines, both those I rebuilt and vehicles purchased new.

Regardless opinions vary, todays engines are very durable. ::021::
 

Checkswrecks

Ungenear to broked stuff
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#46
Tempesc said:
This made for an interesting read, especially as i picked up my new bike Friday and have done the first 250 miles 'by the book'.

What have i learned:

1. There are strong views on both sides of the argument (i have no idea what is right).

2. You are not always very nice to each other on this forum :-(

In the end as a someone without the knowledge to make an informed assessment i'm following the book. Seems the safest option. If i miss out on 0.27bhp so be it. If i cared about the last 0.27bhp i wouldn't have bought the S10 to start with.

Very happy to respect everyones views and choices.

For what its worth, bike is running nice, and freeing up. Spent a few hours riding twisties in the hills in 4th and 5th, taking it up to 4k revs. 60mph was plenty on the roads i was on and lots of changes of revs.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Things would frequently get testy in those early days, before the following change in moderating the forum:
http://www.yamahasupertenere.com/index.php?topic=13192.0


We're pretty laid back now that folks are aware to leave out the personal sniping.


::003::
 

EricV

Riding, farkling, riding...
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#48
Do what makes you happy, but please use a dictionary when reading the owner's manual. ;) Seems most folks that like to argue don't bother to understand what is written there. The RPM limit suggestions are not hard limits, it clearly says to avoid sustained runs above those limits during the break in periods, as outlined.

Enjoy your new bike! ::001::
 

BaldKnob

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#49
It's probably been mentioned previously but frequent on-off throttle during the "break in" mileage is a good idea and using the engine braking to help seat both sides of the rings. Urban and back roads riding would be better than highway miles. Short blasts of throttle here and there throughout the first 600 miles then have at it.
 
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#50
Cheers, I am.

Yes, i had considered exactly what that meant. Am planning to stretch it bit by bit but i have taken it slightly higher momentarily so far for the odd overtake.


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Zepfan

Inuvik to Darien. Dream to ride, ride for ADV.
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#51
to 600/mi

Allow bike to completely warm up at idle.
Ride at varying speeds with lots of engine breaking not to exceed 4500 rpm.
Ride for 15 - 45 minutes, longer w. more mileage.
Allow bike to completely cool down between short initial break in rides. This helps re arrange the molecules (temper) in the cylinders.
After 600 continue to 1000 miles w/ above, rpm increasing to 5500 up to 2 hour ride towards end of 1000.
Engine breaking and soft rolling rpm's up and down really help as well as the warm up and cool down. Short inter volts.
1000 and up, change oil non syn. and pretty much start to let her rip.
 
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#52
Hello, tomorrow I'll get my brand new S-10, so I'll have to make the brake in...
I think I'll follow an intermediate way, with no over rev, nor under rev, lots of accel/deceleration and carefully with the brakes for the first kms.
Have you change the original syntetic oil for a mineral one?

Enviado desde mi Nexus 5 mediante Tapatalk
 

WJBertrand

Ventura Highway
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#53
I let the dealer do the 600 mile service and started using synthetic at about 3K miles. First thing I did after picking up my new Tenere was to take it back up a tight canyon until I put about 50 miles on it.


-Jeff
 

WJBertrand

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#55
Donk said:
When I took my bike in for the 600 mile service the Dealer told me that Yamaha does not recommend going to full synthetic until 4000 miles. I followed his advice and bike has been great.
I switched over at about 3200 miles, but I was leaving on a long trip of 3-4K and didn't want to wait until after.
 

groundhog

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#56
This is a short video of Nick Sanders S10 stripped down after 50,000 miles non stop from new on his 'Incredible ride' trip. He didn't get the first service until about 3,000 miles.

https://youtu.be/tCHWsSRWMkc
 

tomatocity

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#57
groundhog said:
This is a short video of Nick Sanders S10 stripped down after 50,000 miles non stop from new on his 'Incredible ride' trip. He didn't get the first service until about 3,000 miles.

https://youtu.be/tCHWsSRWMkc
Yamaha would not have used my 2012 when it was disassembled at 52,200 miles. Huge amounts of carbon deposits inside the cylinder. Yamaha still won't admit what caused the carbon deposits though some suspect timing.
 
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#58
Boy this sure is a heated thread. I simply warm up the bike fully and will ride it mellow for the first 1000 miles or so. I had a few cruise control runs at around 4000 rpm for 10 minutes or so.

Every so often these kind of threads pop up and guys will jump in and recite the Moto Man method or post a google link to some scientific way of breaking in a motor. Over the years I just break in my engines mellow. I'm of the opinion of letting it warm up fully is more important than anything else.

One thing I am doing different is to use mineral oil for the first 6000 miles or so. I'll be changing it about every 1000 miles after my 600 mile dealer service. I did my first oil change at 68 miles and it was black.
 

richarddacat

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#59
It didn’t baby my engine which now has 1100 miles on it. Never lugged it and did a lot of engine braking, no long periods at one rpm.

I also changed the oil and filter at 300 miles and then installed magnetic drain plugs.

I had Castro’s GTX on the shelf and used that. Feeling unsure what Yamaha would think and wanting to change the oil again at 900 I bought Yamalube and used that.

I did notice a big difference is how slick the tranny felt when using the GTX over the yamalube.

Also changed the rear drive at 300 too.

Thinking of going synthetic around 8000 or 10k. Mobil1 most likely.
 

richarddacat

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#60
Something else that’s odd.
Instead of measuring the oil I filled to the center of the sight glass.
After running it a bit it appeared I overfilled it. Needed to drain some out.

Guess it’s best to measure exactly and tweek accordingly.
 
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