Should I Import my S10?

tpak

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#1
Hello. I currently have a job offer including relocation to move to Melbourne. I haven't decided yet but will quite possibly accept the offer if my tax advisor here in the US can assure me that I will be able to avoid being taxed here as well as Australia. The relocation services said I could ship my '12 Tenere but that I would be responsible for import duties. The person I spoke with was junior and couldn't tell me what the duties would likely be and that I'd have to wait to decide until I accept the job and they are fully engaged to give me an estimate. Do any of you have experience with this or know how I could calculate it myself?

Thanks in advance!
 

EricV

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#2
Contact a customs broker in Melborne via email. Likely they can ask a few questions and get a specific price for you. Try to find one that specializes in vehicles. My customs broker in Vegas does this and is very savvy on vehicle imports into the US. You would need someone that knows imports into Australia.

It's different if you are doing it for a known period, in most cases. They have Super Tenere's there, but yours is not the same spec. US bikes don't have immobilizers, (red key). I don't think the emissions would be an issue for an older bike, but may for a newer one. Euro4 just started there, IIRC.
 
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#3
My guess is that you are importing a vehicle, therefore you will be paying duties on the "Sale" value of that motorcycle which could be in the thousands.... Tough choice. You could sell it and buy another one down there.
 

Checkswrecks

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#4
I'm sure that some Aussie members will chime in, but till then be very careful. Their import duties on vehicles can be prohibitive. The age ought to help a lot, but I wouldn't be surprised if their duty is what your bike is worth, here in the US.
 

Dogdaze

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#5
Most countries have a 'personal belonging allowance', ie, if you have owned a vehicle for a certain amount of time it comes in as part of your 'furniture' so is exempt from duties. However, I would not deal with the hassle of importing, road certifying (MOT, MFK etc) and registering, sell up and but locally. You should also be covered under the dual taxation clause, but would still have to file US tax returns, even if you don't need to pay any US taxes, welcome to the black hole that is US tax filing from abroad......
 

Sierra1

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#6
For me, much would depend on the duration of the job; now & forever or just a year or two. Next would be the frequency of riding the bike. If you're only going to do occasional trips, rental may be the way to go after selling the bike here. If you're a daily rider, sell the '12 here, and buy a replacement there. Take all your "goodies" off of this bike, and put them on the new one? In my world, money makes the decision. Good luck with the new job.
 

tpak

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#7
Thanks guys. I've emailed an importer in AUS to get more info. I'm guessing that it is not worth the hassle and the $. I'm not that attached to the bike and could just as easily get another once there but figure it is worth figuring it out.
 

AVGeek

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#9
Nikolajsen said:
Sorry...of topic..please forgive me :)

WHAT...don't you guys "over there" have immobilizers?
Yes, no immobilizers here in the US. Motorcycles are seen as toys, and not viable transportation, so tend to spend more time parked away than actually ridden.
 

EricV

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#11
Sierra1 said:
Ok, my turn....what is a red key immobilizer. I am assuming it is chipped? ???
Every other market besides the US, bikes have factory immobilizer systems making it more difficult for them to be stolen, and next to impossible to start w/o the correct chip key matched to the bike's ECU. Every Yamaha comes with two black keys and one red key. If you need a replacement key, you must present the red key to a locksmith or the dealer in order for the new key to be programmed. The red key is also used in some user related tasks, IIRC.

Some brands like Ducati, won't sell a replacement chip key. You have to buy a new ECU with matching keys. (Or at least this used to be the case when I last checked some time back)
 

Dogdaze

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#12
Sierra1 said:
Ok, my turn....what is a red key immobilizer. I am assuming it is chipped? ???
Yep, you are correct sir! In EU it is almost mandated that all motor vehicles have immobilisers, or insurance companies will not insure, or will not pay out in the event of a loss (read theft).
On bikes (including Fiat/Alfa's) there is a chipped ignition key and the 'Red' key is used to re-code the bike's ECU at the dealership in the event of a complete failure.
 

Roge

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#13
I imported a US spec Venture Star into Australia when we moved here in 2005. It wasn't difficult. My move was a company move. Pickfords moved and created it but the bike can't go until you are here a lodge the paperwork as you have to be here to import.
You have to prove ownership and use, bills past registration etc.
The bike has to be de-fueled with the battery disconnected and spotless to avoid decontamination charges.
I paid A$1100 in duty 10% if I remember and challenged the customs valuation by getting a dealer to give me a written valuation as part of the deal to service it.
There is a inspection but it was harmless and they issue an Australian compliance plate.
Bikes are expensive here an S10 new is $20-24k and I would say if the bike is paid for, loved and you wouldn't be changing it then it's worth the effort.
All the rules and documentation are online. This is personal import of a possession and not importing a bike because you fancy something that is different the two cases differ. You removal guys do the move you lodge the papers, I didn't use an agent. PM me if you want. Good luck.
 

Sierra1

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#14
Nikolajsen said:
WHAT...don't you guys "over there" have immobilizers?

So, Yamaha installs immobilizers "over there" & center stands and thicker passenger seats "over here"? ::024:: Wow.
 

tpak

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#15
Roge said:
I imported a US spec Venture Star into Australia when we moved here in 2005. It wasn't difficult. My move was a company move. Pickfords moved and created it but the bike can't go until you are here a lodge the paperwork as you have to be here to import.
You have to prove ownership and use, bills past registration etc.
The bike has to be de-fueled with the battery disconnected and spotless to avoid decontamination charges.
I paid A$1100 in duty 10% if I remember and challenged the customs valuation by getting a dealer to give me a written valuation as part of the deal to service it.
There is a inspection but it was harmless and they issue an Australian compliance plate.
Bikes are expensive here an S10 new is $20-24k and I would say if the bike is paid for, loved and you wouldn't be changing it then it's worth the effort.
All the rules and documentation are online. This is personal import of a possession and not importing a bike because you fancy something that is different the two cases differ. You removal guys do the move you lodge the papers, I didn't use an agent. PM me if you want. Good luck.
Thanks for the info, I found some of that online. Definitely going to get it priced out, bike is fully paid for and seems like it would be less than AUS$ 20k to import it but we'll see.
 

Don in Lodi

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#16
Would an international traveler's Carnet come into play? You'd be there temporarily on a work visa, not sure the whole import-so-it-can-be-sold thing needs to happen. Even then it's a tax on the value of the bike, not the value of a new bike. Should be far less expensive than a $20,000 replacement. More like an extended riding vacation that you happen to work through. We have an international traveler here, Trevor, he has stayed in country for extended periods, perhaps he might know the hoops to jump, the correct terminology to get the best results. He's headed 'home' now to Oz. I think his bike is still in London though. You can 'friend' him on Facebook; Trevor Angel is his name. Great guy.
 

Dogdaze

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#17
To add to what Don in Lodi referred to, you can only import on a 'temporary' basis if you are not going to stay over a certain period, most countries allow between 6-12 months before import duty and taxes must be paid and then registered in country.
 

Don in Lodi

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#18
Dogdaze said:
To add to what Don in Lodi referred to, you can only import on a 'temporary' basis if you are not going to stay over a certain period, most countries allow between 6-12 months before import duty and taxes must be paid and then registered in country.

Can a person renew the temporary status? My only experience is second hand South America. A friend has been down there three seasons in a row now. He has a California registered DR parked in Paraguay because they're the only country that offers a one year 'temporary' status. Now that I write that, they require that the bike leave the country to restart the clock. They tried to park in Chile the first season, but it didn't work out right, language issues, wound up with some fines. Still less than buying a bike. On that note, he does now know that it would have been less of a PIA to have bought local rather than importing/shipping. It requires a higher cash outlay at the start, but minimizes issues at the end, at least in S. America.
 

Dogdaze

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#19
Temporary status is only for persons, not belongings. Temporary so that they can kick you out should they decide you have outlived your welcome. The reason for 'forced' import is so that you pay import duty and then they can also track and fine you should you commit a traffic offence. In the EU they cite 'smuggling' as a reason, only because they cannot be bothered to change the rules to reflect the current situation with open borders.......
 
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