S10 Suspension compared to Africa Twin for aching back

SilentSoaring

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Hi,

I am looking for a bike to replace my Vstrom 650, since my back demands a better suspension to isolate all road irregularities from it.
I ride mostly Solo, commuting to work during the week, but also doing long trips with wife and luggage on weekends.

been looking at S10 and AT.

Will S10 suspension be as capable as AT to provide a comfortable ride mostly on the tarmac, with some speed bumps here and there, or should I opt for AT?

Will be thankfull for feedback, prefferably from those who have experience with both models.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Don in Lodi

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The electronic suspension on the Tenere can be very cushy at the push of a button. If you and/or your passenger are on the larger side you will probably run out of suspension on either bike.
 

Ksm1000

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I'm new to the S10 having come over from a 2012 650 v-strom. Never ridden the AT. That said, I think the S10 will be your much better option particularly for "long trips with wife and luggage". AT only wins in the dirt.
 

SilentSoaring

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I'm new to the S10 having come over from a 2012 650 v-strom. Never ridden the AT. That said, I think the S10 will be your much better option particularly for "long trips with wife and luggage". AT only wins in the dirt.
Thank you KSM
 

SilentSoaring

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depends on your weight and wifes,

the standard suspension was no good for me and wife and luggauge had to replace re shock, you may be ok with spring change

rob
Thank you Rob,
me and my wife are about 370 pounds without luggage (Mainly because of me), so I think suspension upgrade will be beneficial in our case regardless of bike.
 

Boris

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The Super Tenere come in two main variations, Gen1 and Gen2 from 2014 onwards. The latter has the option of electronic suspension, which is more capable that the Gen1 under sprung set up.
 

Cantab

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Im a new recruit to the S10 also, i bought a 16 ES and i reckon this would be the way to go for your comfort as others said you can dial in the
suspension settings fairly well and esp for your commuting it will be a godsend.

Two up so far has its been quite good altho we havnt had it loaded up for a weekend yet and wont till summer.
Im really enjoying my ES's ride.

Sorry never rode a AT so cant compare.
 

Mak10

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I had my 16 ES loaded two up this weekend. Full camp gear. Between my wife and I with gear we are about 345lb. I think it rode great. Setting-two up with luggage +2 hard.
 

Sierra1

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Disclaimer: I've never ridden an AT, but it "reads" more "dirt orientated". The chain drive would be an instant DQ for me.

My opinion: If you plan on riding solo & two up, the ES is the way to go. Being able to adjust rebound/dampening on the fly is fantastic. (nothing wrong with a non-ES, just not as convenient) "I" am going to respectfully disagree with those that recommend a stiffer spring. I use two helmets for preload on most roads. I have been using some super crappy roads for commuting, and have reduced the preload to one helmet + luggage. (it took the harshness out of the big bumps) Like Mak10, I'm using the +2/hard, to reduce the "pogo-ing". I'm 300lbs, and with my wife riding with me. . . . . the bike's hauling 450lb. . . . which I believe is the GVWR. I've ridden with her through curves chasing my kid on an FJR, and never felt "under sprung". The bike's a big girl, but she carries her weight extremely well; feels lighter than she is. 6.5 gal fuel tank, cruise control, and shaft drive, make her a fantastic long-hauler. There's a guy here, eemsreno, that has 250k miles on his, IIRC. So, she'll hold up, and not leave you stranded. . . . unlike a certain three lettered brand did to me more than once.

But, it's going to be your bike. Don't just listen to us. Ride them both. You'll know the right bike when you find her. :)
 
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Mak10

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I need to clarify, my wife and I in riding gear are 345. Plus about 100 lbs of “stuff” strapped the bike. I look d at an Africa Twin, and it didn’t seem near as comfortable two up. And then there is the chain.
 

SilentSoaring

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Im a new recruit to the S10 also, i bought a 16 ES and i reckon this would be the way to go for your comfort as others said you can dial in the
suspension settings fairly well and esp for your commuting it will be a godsend.

Two up so far has its been quite good altho we havnt had it loaded up for a weekend yet and wont till summer.
Im really enjoying my ES's ride.

Sorry never rode a AT so cant compare.
Thank you Cantab
 

SilentSoaring

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Disclaimer: I've never ridden an AT, but it "reads" more "dirt orientated". The chain drive would be an instant DQ for me.

My opinion: If you plan on riding solo & two up, the ES is the way to go. Being able to adjust rebound/dampening on the fly is fantastic. (nothing wrong with a non-ES, just not as convenient) "I" am going to respectfully disagree with those that recommend a stiffer spring. I use two helmets for preload on most roads. I have been using some super crappy roads for commuting, and have reduced the preload to one helmet + luggage. (it took the harshness out of the big bumps) Like Mak10, I'm using the +2/hard, to reduce the "pogo-ing". I'm 300lbs, and with my wife riding with me. . . . . the bike's hauling 450lb. . . . which I believe is the GVWR. I've ridden with her through curves chasing my kid on an FJR, and never felt "under sprung". The bike's a big girl, but she carries her weight extremely well; feels lighter than she is. 6.5 gal fuel tank, cruise control, and shaft drive, make her a fantastic long-hauler. There's a guy here, eemsreno, that has 250k miles on his, IIRC. So, she'll hold up, and not leave you stranded. . . . unlike a certain three lettered brand did to me more than once.

But, it's going to be your bike. Don't just listen to us. Ride them both. You'll know the right bike when you find her. :)
Thanks Sierra
 

ballisticexchris

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I too mirror Robert's "Sierra's" opinion on the ES suspension. I made the mistake of measuring the sag when I first got the bike. I then made a bigger mistake of going on the forums and reading opinions on how under-sprung the stock Super Tenere is. As a disclaimer, I'm sure there is some improvement to be had. For myself the stock suspension is just fine until I have it serviced around the 10,000 mile mark.

My suggestion is to ride the bike and play with the adjustments. There are 84 different combinations to try. IMHO, the biggest mistake riders make is to not take into consideration the weight of this bike. It's not like we are going to jump it like a dirt bike. While the sag measurements don't lie, this bike has plenty of suspension without the fear of bottoming out. As far as the bike wallowing, I was able to tune it out with stiffening up the damping and preload.
 

Checkswrecks

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I'm assuming you are in the US and what follows is based on that:

The Super Ten is MUCH better for commuting and occasional trips, especially 2-up. I commuted roughly an hour into DC on most days for over 7 years on a Gen1 and then Gen2 and ridden the same bikes all over the country. If your commute involves any highway you will quickly appreciate the cruise control and the shaft means no chain maintenance. The Super Ten with a set of summer and winter (touring) windscreens will provide MUCH better weather protection for both touring and commuting.

Honda's AT feels more like a dirt bike and would be a better commuter in Europe where lane splitting is normal. I've done a lot of it on the Tenere too, but the AT just handles slightly faster.

All that said, you'll need to test ride both bikes to see if one agrees more with your back. btw - Doing planks REALLY helps with my lower back issues.
 
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