Author Topic: Dealer won't install tires?  (Read 1032 times)

Offline Cycledude

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2017, 11:21:41 am »
Waiting until the last minute usually causes extra trouble.
2013 Tenere heading for Alaska about May 25th 2016
2002 Honda GL1800, yellow, currently 465,000 smiles

Offline Sierra1

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #31 on: July 14, 2017, 05:39:01 pm »
Be good to your local dealer (if they'll let you) because you're going to miss them when they're gone.   


That's why I'm kinda good with paying a little extra for some things.
In the stable:'17 TENERE ES; '14 FJR ES; '86 FJ 1200
Out to Pasture: '77 XS 360; '81 SECA 550; '00 KZ 1000P; '04 BMW 1150 RT-P; '11 ST1300PA; '11 KLR

Offline blitz11

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #32 on: July 14, 2017, 07:34:27 pm »
Here are my $0.02. 

1. It's a new world.  EVERYONE has to adapt to the new world.  Those who adapt survive, those who don't, don't.     

2. I spent my HS and college (well, first 4 years) working in an  independent shop.  I worked at Brenny's M/C clinic. in bettendorf, IA.  we sold USED bikes.  Buy cheap in the fall, sell for bigger money in the spring.  My boss employed my brother and me. we worked cheap, but learned a great deal, which made the difference in our engineering careers.   We would rebuild honda 350 engines all winter. when  a customer came with a junk motor, we could have him back on the road in an afternoon, not two weeks while we waited for parts. (can't do that now, but it was huge back then).  Same thing with ATC engines, and some dirt bike engines.

3. When the early 80's recession hit, my boss bought up the dealerships which went out of business - suzuki, yamaha, kawasaki.  Those, at first, were a side business as the used bike market was much more profitable.  What new bikes brought was were more USED bikes, which we could flip at a profit.  If the bike was in good shape, we'd even offer a warranty.  Unheard of back then, but it gave buyers confidence.  having gone through the bike, we knew the risk, which was low.

4. When the internet hit, the parts/accessories/tires/clothes/helmet model changed.  The new business model became that the shop did used bikes, new bikes, serviced everything, and now serves as a convenience store for riders.  Need a quart of oil? get it here. want your tires mounted? Sure, we'll do it even if iyou carry in the tires. it's revenue.  Stock the basics to get someone on the road in an emergency, but basically, just serve the convenience market.  This worked, and overhead costs actually dropped 'cause less inventory was coverer. Helmets? just a few in each size so if there is an issue and the person is desperate, we can serve them, and put them back on the road.

5. Buy up old dealerships, and then start an ebay business.  One man's junk is another man's treasure.  we sold used parts when i worked there - from wrecked bikes. Now, the market is worldwide, not just the quad cities. 

6. The secret is to understand the new world, and adapt to it.  it takes guts, but it can be done. 

I look back at where this was when it started, and what my boss built over the past 40 years, and it is amazing.  He offered me $15K/year the day i graduated from high school.   I said, "no, i am going to engineering school." this is when engineers made $18K starting salary.  12 years of college and three degrees later, i think i should have stayed at the shop, learned more, and started my own shop.  but, who knows.

To this day, i do ALL my own service.  i call the local dealers first for parts. if they have them, i buy them.  If not, i go internet.  I give the locals a chance.

blitz.

Offline OldRider

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #33 on: July 15, 2017, 12:17:30 pm »
Here are my $0.02. 

1. It's a new world.  EVERYONE has to adapt to the new world.  Those who adapt survive, those who don't, don't.     

2. I spent my HS and college (well, first 4 years) working in an  independent shop.  I worked at Brenny's M/C clinic. in bettendorf, IA.  we sold USED bikes.  Buy cheap in the fall, sell for bigger money in the spring.  My boss employed my brother and me. we worked cheap, but learned a great deal, which made the difference in our engineering careers.   We would rebuild honda 350 engines all winter. when  a customer came with a junk motor, we could have him back on the road in an afternoon, not two weeks while we waited for parts. (can't do that now, but it was huge back then).  Same thing with ATC engines, and some dirt bike engines.

3. When the early 80's recession hit, my boss bought up the dealerships which went out of business - suzuki, yamaha, kawasaki.  Those, at first, were a side business as the used bike market was much more profitable.  What new bikes brought was were more USED bikes, which we could flip at a profit.  If the bike was in good shape, we'd even offer a warranty.  Unheard of back then, but it gave buyers confidence.  having gone through the bike, we knew the risk, which was low.

4. When the internet hit, the parts/accessories/tires/clothes/helmet model changed.  The new business model became that the shop did used bikes, new bikes, serviced everything, and now serves as a convenience store for riders.  Need a quart of oil? get it here. want your tires mounted? Sure, we'll do it even if iyou carry in the tires. it's revenue.  Stock the basics to get someone on the road in an emergency, but basically, just serve the convenience market.  This worked, and overhead costs actually dropped 'cause less inventory was coverer. Helmets? just a few in each size so if there is an issue and the person is desperate, we can serve them, and put them back on the road.

5. Buy up old dealerships, and then start an ebay business.  One man's junk is another man's treasure.  we sold used parts when i worked there - from wrecked bikes. Now, the market is worldwide, not just the quad cities. 

6. The secret is to understand the new world, and adapt to it.  it takes guts, but it can be done. 

I look back at where this was when it started, and what my boss built over the past 40 years, and it is amazing.  He offered me $15K/year the day i graduated from high school.   I said, "no, i am going to engineering school." this is when engineers made $18K starting salary.  12 years of college and three degrees later, i think i should have stayed at the shop, learned more, and started my own shop.  but, who knows.

To this day, i do ALL my own service.  i call the local dealers first for parts. if they have them, i buy them.  If not, i go internet.  I give the locals a chance.

blitz.

While all this sounds good, it's impossible for EVERYONE to adapt to the new world. First off In my opinion 95% of the dealers out there can't match internet prices. They can't buy the merchandise as cheap as the internet sellers and they have a lot higher overhead. There are three major parts houses left, Parts Unlimited, Tucker Rocky and Western Powersports and none of them care about the dealer anymore. It's all about the $dollar. The dealers revenue is going down and if they don't buy enough from the wholesalers, they have to pay a higher price and their shipping allowance goes down. The worst things get, the harder the parts houses make it on you.

EVERYONE can't get into the Ebay business or start selling on the internet for the same reason they can't price match in their brick & mortar store, they can't buy at a good price. A while back I thought I would give it a shot and put a few items on Ebay and pick up a little extra money during the Winter. I looked at about ten different items and when I went to see what they were selling for on Ebay, I couldn't make more than 2-3% on anything I looked at. What the end game in all this is going to be is anyones guess. The profits in the internet selling game are so low now and with more sellers jumping in, it's got to blow up one of these days. Wal-Mart has had enough of Amazon taking their business away and they're fighting back real hard now. This will be good for the consumer, but it has to end sooner or later.

As for bring a convenience store for riders, you hit the nail on the head. Spark plugs, tubes, batteries, brake pads, oil, filters, atv axle bearings and cleaners & polishes are the big sellers now a days.  I didn't like it when riders started buying tires off the net and wanting me to mount and balance them, but it didn't take me long to realize that was the way the world was heading. Another local shop won't mount internet tires, so I get all that business in the area. I get $110 -$140 a pair depending on the bike and I'm still making a living. While I was typing this a guy called that was traveling through the area and had to have a battery. I'll have him on the road in a few minutes, the internet still can't do that. 

Offline Defekticon

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #34 on: July 16, 2017, 01:40:34 am »
Major thank you to Blitz for getting me squared away. I pulled tires and he got them on the tire stand, installed and balanced. Had a heck of a time getting the front bead to seat , but the rear seated with a ratchet straps just fine. I'm going to look up that tire stand when I get home. It was awesome at breaking beads. Far better than my harbor freight stand with mojo blocks. Offered some money to at least cover shop supplies and he wouldn't take a dime. Many thanks again.

Thank you tomato for reminding me how awesome that ride would be. I put 450 miles on the bike today. Got stuck in a herd of bison, got poured rain on and saw some of the most beautiful land between big sky and Bozeman.

Here's a pic all decked out with the dakars in front of Sylvan lake in East Yellowstone.
IMG 20170715 210210
IMG 20170715 210210
'14 Blue S10
'17 KTM 500EXC-F

Offline blitz11

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #35 on: July 16, 2017, 09:47:52 am »
I've seen that bike! Nice to meet Defekticon!! Not only is he a great guy, but one interesting cat.  We should all have as interesting a life story.

I've NEVER had to take a tire to 90 psi to get the bead to seat  before.  Good luck breaking that bead when it's time to change tires.  Yikes. 

Glad to know you made it back to base camp. 

Enjoy the rest of your trip!!

blitz

Offline RonH

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #36 on: July 16, 2017, 10:29:54 am »
Did you use good tire lube and follow nomar instructions to fully lube the drop center of the wheels? Since doing this, all my tire changes have the bead all seated by 30lb at most. For the guys that still use soap/water, don't.
2017 Super Tenere 1200ES, 2008 Honda GL1800 Goldwing

Offline blitz11

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #37 on: July 16, 2017, 11:04:06 am »
Lubed the bead and the sidewall with my special "Safety Lube - the slickest thing for tires" tire lube.  i've never lubed the rim, just lubed the tire quite a  bit. some of the problem might have been that the tires were strapped in a trailer, and perhaps a bit deformed. 


Offline Defekticon

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #38 on: July 17, 2017, 10:32:12 am »
Did you use good tire lube and follow nomar instructions to fully lube the drop center of the wheels? Since doing this, all my tire changes have the bead all seated by 30lb at most. For the guys that still use soap/water, don't.

The Dakar variant of the Mitas E-07 have exceptionally stiff sidewalls and take more pressure to fully seat. It's a beefy tire. I typically use windex and have never had issues seating beads on Michelin T63's or Metzler Tourance's that I had on the bike previously. That wouldn't have worked with these tires.
'14 Blue S10
'17 KTM 500EXC-F

Offline Don in Lodi

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2017, 10:04:58 am »
Lubed the bead and the sidewall with my special "Safety Lube - the slickest thing for tires" tire lube.  i've never lubed the rim, just lubed the tire quite a  bit. some of the problem might have been that the tires were strapped in a trailer, and perhaps a bit deformed.


So, what did the side wall cracks look like to you? Age? Under inflation? ::017::
Don in Lodi
2012 Tenere
1997 Royal Star
1984 CB900
1986 XL600
1981 XL185
1969 CT90

"ride what you want, want what you ride"

Offline Defekticon

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #40 on: July 18, 2017, 12:00:45 pm »
I'll leave blitz to his own take on it, but I believe this was my fault. Over inflation and being strapped down tight enough to bow the sidewall in the trailer. During the first leg of our trip the bike fell over in the trailer and crushed my mountain bike wheel. After that I started cranking down the straps a little tighter, but I should have just added some more straps instead of making them tighter.
'14 Blue S10
'17 KTM 500EXC-F

Offline blitz11

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #41 on: July 18, 2017, 03:08:24 pm »
I didn't look so much at the Metzeler tires which came off, so i can't comment too much about sidewall cracks.

The new Mitas tires were banded together for shipping.  It seemed that on the front tire, where we had the most trouble, didn't have parallel beads.  On opposite sides of the sidewalls, the beads were stuck in the drop-center part of the rim, and we had a lot of air leakage when we went to seat the tire.  We had to lever the bead closer to the sealing surface to lessen the air leak.


Offline Don in Lodi

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #42 on: July 18, 2017, 09:29:25 pm »
I didn't look so much at the Metzeler tires which came off, so i can't comment too much about sidewall cracks.

The new Mitas tires were banded together for shipping.  It seemed that on the front tire, where we had the most trouble, didn't have parallel beads.  On opposite sides of the sidewalls, the beads were stuck in the drop-center part of the rim, and we had a lot of air leakage when we went to seat the tire.  We had to lever the bead closer to the sealing surface to lessen the air leak.


A trick for you; inflate inner tubes in the collapsed tires and lay them out in the sun to cook for a few hours, turning over occasionally. Lacking tubes, just the heating will help a lot.
Don in Lodi
2012 Tenere
1997 Royal Star
1984 CB900
1986 XL600
1981 XL185
1969 CT90

"ride what you want, want what you ride"

Offline blitz11

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #43 on: July 18, 2017, 09:33:02 pm »
Thanks.

1. they were in the sun on the way to Bozeman, and we left them in my driveway to heat up.

2. Tubes - i had 19" tubes; that is a good idea.

 3. Defektion was on a time budget.  i would have had to have levered the tires off, and then back one, and we didn't have time.

Online Checkswrecks

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Re: Dealer won't install tires?
« Reply #44 on: July 19, 2017, 10:09:09 am »
Some tires I've gotten that have been strapped have been so tight that the bead has been slightly bent. I just straighten them by hand (they're tough) before installing or like Blitz wrote, they can be really hard to seat.
Damascus, MD
XTZ1200, KTM 690R

 

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